Board Meeting On Tuesday, December 16th, 2008

Huronia Museum Board of Directors Meeting

Tuesday, December 16th, 2008

Huronia Museum Auditorium

1. 1.  7PM Call meeting to order

2. 2. Monday, November 17th, 2008 Minutes of the Board of Directors Meeting

3. 3.  Curator and Administrator Report

4. 4.  Financial Report

5. 5.  New Business

6. 6.  Future Meeting Dates

7. 7.  Adjournment,

Next Meeting: Tuesday, January 20, 2009

The Village’s New Bark


villae june2604

Originally uploaded by Allegromouse

Huronia Museum has recently purchased new elm bark to re-cover the remaining longhouse in its Huron Ouendat Village. Until 2007, all of the structures in the Huron Ouendat village were covered with organic Elm bark that was provided by a supplier near Cornwall, Ontario. This supplier has since retired and finding Elm trees, which have a circumference that would lend itself to building such impressive structures, are becoming increasingly more difficult to find in Ontario. Our new artificial Elm Bark now comes from a supplier in St. Louis, Missouri and is made of a rubber compound, which should ensure that this life-sized exhibit will last much longer with less maintenance.
The purchase of this bark was thanks to a grant received from the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Museums Assistance Program.

The Village's New Bark


villae june2604

Originally uploaded by Allegromouse

Huronia Museum has recently purchased new elm bark to re-cover the remaining longhouse in its Huron Ouendat Village. Until 2007, all of the structures in the Huron Ouendat village were covered with organic Elm bark that was provided by a supplier near Cornwall, Ontario. This supplier has since retired and finding Elm trees, which have a circumference that would lend itself to building such impressive structures, are becoming increasingly more difficult to find in Ontario. Our new artificial Elm Bark now comes from a supplier in St. Louis, Missouri and is made of a rubber compound, which should ensure that this life-sized exhibit will last much longer with less maintenance.
The purchase of this bark was thanks to a grant received from the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Museums Assistance Program.