Looking Back to 1957

Looking back 60 years in North Simcoe takes a look at archived photographs and newspapers from the local area to give a glimpse of what life was like 60 years ago.

CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO JUNE 15 to 22
CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO DAY June 7 to 14
CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO May 24 to 31
CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO March 1 to 7

(more “Skip to” links coming soon)

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – June 23rd to 30th, 1957

Click on Photos to Enlarge

Forty foot cruiser the “Sea Flight”, owned by Toronto industrialist Robbert Hartog of Kitchen Industries Limited, and Paterson freighter Quedoc collide at about 10:50 PM two miles north of Hope Island. Mr. Hartog was outbound for Little Current with five Scouting youth and another leader while the Quedoc was inbound loaded with grain for Midland. One third of the stern was sheared off but there were no injuries. Passengers were picked up and the cruiser towed to Midland by the Quedoc. These photos are taken at the Great Lake Boat and Machine yards in Sunnyside. 

 Last Monday’s heat was too much for one Midlander. The sign on tailor Bill Wilson’s door speaks for itself.  

Winners of three of the five trophies won by Little League baseball teams in Midland are seen following the “final night” at Parkview School field. Vern Kettle was captain of the New York Giants who beat St. Louis for the National League title. Sandy Berriault led Montreal to victory over Toronto in the International League. Ernie Boast was captain of the American Association winners, Indianapolis Indians. 

An old friend returns to Midland harbour Wednesday, June 19, when the cruise ship South American brought some 350 members and guest of the Cleveland Ohio Chamber of Commerce. A few years ago the South and her sister the North American plus other cruise ships made Midland a regular port of call. Frank Bray, president of the Midland Chamber of Commerce has just presented Curtis Smith, his Cleveland counterpart, with a handsome plaque made by Canadian Name Plate to commemorate the visit. Left to right are; Neville Keefe, Hugh Blair, Frank Bray, Doug Haig, Ted Lounsberry, Mr. Curtis, R. M. Ruhlman secretary of the Cleveland group, harbourmaster Dave Hewis, W. H. Keller and Mayor Charles Parker. 

“Toujours elle était joyeuse.” That’s the way Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Laurin of 115 Fifth Street, Midland, feel about their 50 years of wedded life, having celebrated their golden wedding anniversary June 16. In spite of the trials of nearly a half century of farming, the depression years, two wars and raising 10 children, they still say “it was always happy”. If it was happy, it wasn’t always easy. Born on a Lafontaine farm, Philip started to work at 13. He had to stand on a box to harness the horses. A horse caused him trouble later on, too, when he was kicked in the leg and was out of work for nine months. He met Odianna, daughter of farmer Frank Robitaille, at a dance in Lafontaine. They were married by the then parish priest, Father Desroches, when Mr. Laurin was 25 and she was 18. They raised all their children in Lafontaine, where they themselves were born, and educated. The couple moved to Midland 13 years ago, when Mr. Laurin stopped farming. Their Fifth Street home is close to the church; they like their neighbours; there’s a good-sized vegetable garden. Which is quite enough, they feel, to keep them happy. They have three boys and seven girls living, and all are married. There are 66 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The golden wedding anniversary was the first time all the children had been together at once since they’d grown up. 

“Suffer the little children to come unto Me” is the title of this stained glass window erected in St. Paul’s United Church Midland, in memory of Mary Elizabeth Auld. Miss Ethel Wagg unveiled the window at a special ceremony Sunday and J. W. Smith, the clerk of session, accepted the window on behalf of the congregation. 

 

Newly elected executive of the Midland Junior Chamber of Commerce held its inaugural meeting in the office of the senior chamber Wednesday night. Seated; Ken Webb, director; Frank Bray, president of the senior chamber; Jack Gardiner, Jaycee president. Back row; Herman Livingston, secretary; Armin Weisflogg, treasurer; Bill Spiker, first vice-president; Norman Palmateer, director. 

Four winners of awards for proficiency in social studies are pictured at public school graduation ceremonies at Parkview School. They are Winston Schell (Regent), Arlene Staruck (Parkview), Carol Morrison (Parkview), Lynda Riley (Regent). The awards are presented annually by Kitchikewana Chapter, Imperial Order, Daughters of the Empire. 

Grade 10 graduates at St. Mary’s Separate School in Victoria Harbour receiving their certificates Monday night. Front row; Martha LaChapelle and Maryanne Lavereau. Back row; Alvin Asselin, Allan Arbour, James Brodeur and Michael St. Amand.

  

Ten years ago Roy Fenton built a cruiser of welded aluminum and it was so successful he built another one last winter. Along with his son John, he is seen launching the “Skipper” at Midland dock. Twenty-four feet long with an eight-foot beam and features a “V” drive with the engine at the rear and gear box amidships. 

“It’s a nice country, and the people are nice, too.” That’s why Danish-born Folmar Nielsen gave up a good job near Ottawa to return to the Midland area and begin anew his boat-building business. “We feel more at home here,” said Nielsen. “We” includes his wife and six children, all but one of whom were born in Denmark. Renting a farm on Con. 3, Tay, about half a mile south of Old Fort School he is operating under the name of Nielsen Products. Folmar has all the boat building and repairing he can handle at the moment. On the rush list are a number of boats for various YMCA camps on Beausoleil Island. These have to be ready for the water by July 1. Also on order are a 25-foot motor boat, a sailboat, and several others of smaller size. Folmar also helps out at Roy French’s Midland shop when his services are needed.

This photo was not used in the newspaper but we wanted to include it because it shows the Midland Curling Club before the addition of the club room on the north end, the water fountain that I remember as a kid and the fact that public school field days were held in what was then called the “Midland Town Park”.  Rick Lemieux is seen beside the fountain, others to be identified. 

Another of this area’s grand old couples, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Jones marked their golden wedding anniversary at their Con. 4, Tay, farm home, about a mile west of Port McNicoll, June 19. A farmer all his life, Mr. Jones credits that active vocation with the good health still enjoyed by himself and Mrs. Jones. Now in his 74th year, he has always looked after large stocks of both cattle and sheep. For some 16 years, he was in the wholesale milk business, with the CPR boats at Port McNicoll his largest customers. Although he was born at Cartwright, near Port Perry, Louis Jones has been a resident of this area practically all his life. Louis had two brothers and a sister, all well-known locally. His sister, Miss Annie Jones, was a public school teacher in Midland for many years and still resides here. One brother, James, still lives in Wyevale at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Delbert Reynolds. The other brother, Wilmott, who farmed at Triple Bay after a number of years in Western Canada, died two years ago. Louis Jones got his three R’s at the old Russell School a mile and a half northeast of Vasey. Louis and Emma met when Mr. Jones, Sr., and his son were visiting old friends in the Omemee area. About a year later, June 19, 1907, they were married. For the first six years of their wedded life, Mr. and Mrs. Jones lived on the old homestead at Vasey. It was in the spring of 1914 that they moved to the present farm, just outside Port McNicoll. “Farming then was a lot different than it is today,” said Mr. Jones, who along with his son, Edmond, who has the adjoining farm, still likes to do his share of the chores. With some 300 acres and plenty of stock between them, there is still enough work to keep Mr. Jones plenty active for a man his age. (This anniversary was posted in last weeks edition but with a different photo and less information.)

 

  • The headline, June 26, 1957, Free Press Herald. “Find 24 Foot Boat Washed Ashore, Drag Severn for Missing Workman” Ontario Provincial Police officers from Victoria Harbour detachment yesterday continued dragging operations in the Severn River north of Port Severn in an attempt to discover the body of a cottage workman who has not been seen since he left Port Severn shortly after midnight   Missing and believed drowned is John Butt, 28, of Grafton, who was working at the C. B. Wallace cottage about four miles upriver from Port Severn.
  • The headline, June 28, 1957, County Herald. “Say Move Under Way in Coldwater for Four Way Liquor Vote in the Fall” The village of Coldwater may be faced with a vote on the introduction of a liquor store, brewers’ warehouse and men’s and women’s beverage rooms, it was learned yesterday. A group of Coldwater businessmen are said to be drawing up a petition for such a vote, and that an organizational meeting is to be held Tuesday night.
  • Plaques marking two historic sites at Penetang were unveiled in ceremonies Wednesday afternoon with officials from Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board, Army, Navy, provincial and federal houses and municipalities participating. The historic plaques were erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board to mark St. James’ Garrison Church-on-the-Lines and the site of the residence of Admiral Henry Wolsey Bayfield, R.N.
  • When Francis “Punny” Dumais saw a car rolling along the Main Street of Penetang last week with only a couple of children in it, he decided it was time to act. He eventually stopped the vehicle with his own car. An investigation later revealed the car was owned by Martin Fitzgerald, who, along with his wife was shopping in the IGA store at the time. They had parked the car in front of the store, leaving their two young children in it. While waiting, the children had taken the car out of gear, and it proceeded to roll down the steep Main Street incline. When “Punny” saw the car he accelerated his own vehicle, got in front of it, stopped, and reversed until he came in contact with the wanderer, bringing it to a halt.
  • “Love Me Tender” starring  Elvis Presley is playing at the Pen.
  • Next Monday, July 1, Canada, as a nation, will be 90 years old. To help celebrate that 90th birthday, Midland’s Huronia Museum is opening its doors free on Dominion Day to all children 12 and under. There will be no admission charge next Monday at the museum for any child accompanied by an adult. “Nearly 1,000 school children from all over central Ontario have come to see the museum’s Indian, pioneer and marine exhibits these past four weeks”, explains Mrs. D. H. Wray of the museum staff.
  • A former Midland boy now holds a somewhat unique honour. He is one of four specially trained technicians in Canada in charge of an electronic brain that is reputed to be the most advanced scientific computer in the western world outside of the United States. The “brain” is the only one of its kind in Canada and is the same type as the one that will be used to calculate and predict the orbit of the scientific earth satellite to be launched by a multi-stage rocket into space during the International Geophysical year. One of the four in charge of the computer is Graham Gunn, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Gunn, Midland. Born in Midland, he attended Regent School and Midland District High School.
  • TEN YEARS AGO THIS WEEK; Sugar and molasses were the only products still being rationed when rationing regulations were removed. Price ceilings were also removed from butter, cheese and concentrated milk. * * * The luxury cruise ships, North and South American, had to use radar to dock at Midland because of the heavy fog which hung over the harbour. * * * Each member of the winning team in the OMHA Bantam series was presented with a crest, and a cup was presented to the team. * * * Twenty-two American weekly newspaper editors, on a 10-day goodwill tour of Ontario, visited Midland and Martyrs Shrine while they were in this area. * * * Don Perrault, a petty officer of Midland’s “RCSCC Admiral Yeo” (now RCSCC Huron), was one of 25 Canadian sea cadets selected to visit Britain. * * * Ray Gauthier was appointed principal of Penetang High School. He succeeded Principal E. J. Doris. * * * A new high school area was being discussed by the county council and district school boards. The proposed new area was to include Victoria Harbour, Tay Township, Medonte, Port McNicoll, Penetang and Tiny Township. * * * Midland council decided to hold a special meeting to discuss a plan to operate buses in Midland. Penetang – Midland Coach Lines was seeking a franchise. A group of taxi operators in the town were opposed to the move. * * * West Simcoe Deanery held its 29th annual meeting in All Saints’ Church, Penetang. Seventy-four delegates attended.
  • Fear of missing important telephone calls need no longer keep a person from leaving his home or office unattended. He can now obtain an “electronic secretary” which will automatically answer his telephone when he is absent. Two such devices are now being made available by the Bell Telephone Company in its Ontario-Quebec territory, according to H. A. Kilroy, the company’s manager for this region.
  • A veteran of several campaigns and two world wars, James Somerville, 79, Midland, died Wednesday at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto. Rev. J. L. Self of Knox Presbyterian Church is to officiate at the service Saturday afternoon at Nicholls funeral home. Burial will be at Lakeview Cemetery. Mr. Somerville was a member of the 1st Bn. Grenadier Guards with which he went ‘up the Nile’ under Kitchener in 1895. He was with the Grenadiers at Gibraltar in ’96 and at Khartoum in Egypt in ’97, He received his first campaign medal from the hands of Queen Victoria at Windsor, England, in 1898. Transferred to 3rd Bn. Grenadier Guards in ’99, he fought with them through the South African campaign. Taking his discharge in 1903, he came to Canada. He was back in uniform in World War I, overseas with the Engineers of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. He had four years’ service. In World War II, he served for two more years in the Veterans Guard. He retired after years of service with the Bell Telephone Company several years ago.
  • Next week’s wrestling card at the Arena Gardens headlines a great local favourite, Yukon Eric, against the newest villain of the squared circle, former Edmonton Eskimo football star Gene Kiniski.

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – June 15th to 22nd, 1957


Click on Photos to Enlarge 

Honouring two decades of service to the Midland Lions Club, founding member and treasurer for eight years, Lion Gilmour Nesbitt (Nebbie) is presented with a rocking chair and a new TV to go with it. The presentation was made at the annual dinner of the club held at the Delawana Inn in Honey Harbour. Gilmour is surrounded by past presidents; Webb Struthers, Bill Jeffery, Alex McIntosh, Ed Walker and Gord Boyd. 

 

Town employees raise the newly re-painted flagpole at Midland’s Huronia House Museum in preparation for a new season. 

 

Just about the happiest bunch of fellows in Ontario at the moment are the members of Port McNicoll’s volunteer fire brigade. Some of them, with Chief Lloyd Cameron in front, are seen grouped around their brand new fire truck, which arrived Saturday. Still, others are seen on the old 1919-model engine purchased from Toronto Fire Department in 1950. Along with the new $17,500.00 truck, the brigade also has the latest type resuscitator.

Nearly ninety golfers from several Simcoe County clubs turned out for the open invitation match held at the Midland Golf & Country Club June 12th. The eventual winner was Walter “Windy” Varty from Orillia with a gross of 76. Pictured are A. I. “Doc” Merchant checking the scoreboard while club captain Norm Greene takes Clive Parks entry fee. 

 

One of the highlights of the annual year-end dinner held by the Midland Lion’s Club at the Delawana Inn is the installation of new officers. Pictured is the new president Cecil English and his wife Maddy and the outgoing president Bill Jeffery and his wife Judy.

 A dunk in the washtub was the solution these Fifth Street youngsters found for beating the heat earlier this week. It was an obviously sheer delight but those in the queue were getting a trifle impatient.(There are several favourite photos we have found in the Free Press collection to date, this being one of them, and they almost always feature children.) 

Back in 1909 two brothers from Vasey married two sisters from Omemee. One-half of that combination is pictured, Mr. & Mrs. Louis Jones farmed just west of Port McNicoll on Highway 12 and still live there. Mrs. Jones’ sister Minnie died a few years ago and her husband James Jones lives with his daughter Mrs. Delbert Reynolds at Wyevale. 

  • The headline, Midland Free Press, Wednesday, June 19, 1957. Council Orders Government Probe Ask for 15 Year Civic Affairs Study. A four-hour meeting of Victoria Harbour council was marred by threats and accusations among the councillors. “This is a council of hate. It’s the rottenest council in Ontario. The town is run just like a little Chicago.” These were the words of Reeve Florence Belcher, repeated on several occasions, during a session of the council at Victoria Harbour Thursday night that ran the gamut from periods of comparative quiet to almost riotous scenes in which all members of the council, and some of the audience, took part simultaneously. The issue causing the upset is a multi-year debate over water access and road allowances at Robins Point. (Sound familiar?)
  • The headline, County Herald, Friday, June 19th, 1957. Severe Electrical Storm Causes Extensive Damage in North SimcoeFollowing on the heels of a three-day heat wave, a severe electrical storm caused extensive damage to district telephone and power lines, damaged numerous household appliances, radios and TV sets and struck one summer home in Tiny Township Tuesday morning. Although it brought cooler weather in its wake, the storm left a trail of toppled trees, leaning telephone poles on some rural lines, and scattered tree branches.
  • Paving operations on County Road 6 from one mile north of Elmvale to Wyevale got under way last. week. The four and one-half mile stretch of work is being done by Brennan Paving Co.
  • No lawn or garden sprinkling will be permitted until further notice. Midland Public Utilities Commission.
  • Motorists returning to Midland, northbound on Highway 27, report that on Sunday night cars were lined along the southbound lane from Highway 400 to near Elmvale. Greatest bottleneck, they said, still exists at the junction of Highways 26 and 27. (At this time Highway 400 ended at Crown Hill. Tiny, Tay and Severn tourists and cottagers were using Hwy 27 to go south or in the east, Hwy 11 at Orillia. Wasaga Beach tourists were using Hwy 26 to get to the 400 at Barrie.)
  • 25 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK – Public Utilities Commission representatives from Georgian Bay district municipalities held a special meeting in Collingwood. The main item under fire was a practice of the Ontario Hydro of demanding large sums from municipalities two years after all accounts have been paid. The 43 delegates present decided to hold an organizational meeting in Midland in September and to elect officers who would lodge a determined protest against the practice. * * * A Toronto construction firm had been awarded the contract for constructing the extension to Midland dock. It was the lowest of ten who bid for the work. * * * Thiffault opened a new bakery at Waubaushene. More than 600 district citizens attended the official opening which featured dancing and refreshments. * * * A Romanian girl parachutist, Samaranda Braescue had established a new world record jump, Miss Braescue and pilot Harry Dosshardt climbed to 24,000 feet over Sacramento, Cal., in a light bi-plane. Miss Braescue bailed out and landed safely at Marysville, near Sacramento. * * * Millions of feet of lumber were destroyed in a fire which swept through the lumber yards at the Letherby-Nicholson plant in Midland. The blaze, of undetermined origin, broke out about 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night. Penetang brigade was called to assist the Midland firemen. * * * Provincial police officers arrested two men and a boy in connection with a series of cottage break-ins in the Go-Home-Bay area. One of the two men was later given two years in Kingston Penitentiary, the other received from one to two years in Burwash and the boy received a 30-day jail term.
  • When the old community center in Little Lake Park was cut into three sections for transportation to its new site on ski club property, it was discovered that the flooring was three inch by one inch Douglas fir—LAID ON EDGE! 
  • OBITUARY: Funeral service for Mrs. J. Cena Brunelle, Penetang, was held in St. Ann’s Church, Penetang, Monday, June 3, with Rev. L. McGough officiating. Interment was in St. Croix Cemetery, Lafontaine. Pallbearers were Roger and Martial Brunelle, Roland, Celestin, Gabriel and Urbain Maurice. The former Lena Payette, Mrs. Brunelle died in Penetang General Hospital Friday, May 31, following a short illness. Born in Lafontaine. June 13, 1892, she spent her early life and married J. Cena Brunelle there in 1910. The couple moved to Penetang 30 years ago. She was an ardent gardener, and particularly interested in horticulture. Many people in Penetang admired her flower gardens which were one of the town’s show places each year. She was a Roman Catholic. Surviving, besides her husband, are six sons. Maurice, Eugene, Marc and Joseph of Penetang, Cleo, Montreal, and Jacques, White River; and five daughters. Mrs. J. Crawford and Mrs. Art Roy, Sudbury: Mrs. E. C. Macleod, Toronto: Mrs. Ross MacDonald, Montreal, and Annette at home. One sister, Mrs. A. Desroches, also survives.
  • Two historical plaques, both connected with the famous old military and naval establishment which guarded British interests on the upper lakes from about 1814 to 1852, will be unveiled at Penetanguishene Wednesday, June 26 at 2 p.m. One plaque commemorates Admiral Henry Wolsey Bayfield, while the second marks the old Garrison Church of St. James-on-the-Lines.
  • Work has begun on a new three-classroom continuation school for the parish of St. Margaret’s, on property at George Street and Dominion Avenue, Midland. It is hoped the one-storey frame structure will be ready for occupancy in September. The school will accommodate Grade 9 and 10 pupils, with the possibility of other grades later. Rev. M. A. Beriault said yesterday. Grade 9 and 10 pupils were formerly housed in two upstairs rooms in Sacred Heart School.

Morley Spiker passed away on Father’s Day, last Sunday, he was in his 91st year. The museum has a few photos of Morley we would like to share in tribute to this popular Midland son.
“From the mid-1940s until the end of the 1960s, Morley Spiker proved to be the touchstone for dependability, work ethic and sustained excellence for Midland’s junior, intermediate and senior hockey teams. Even after he had retired from the local hockey scene, members of the media, players, teammates and opponents alike, when recalling those days, would immediately speak of his magnificent skills and his undying commitment to his hometown.”

“Morley seemed to go on forever,” said the late Charlie Noquet, also an honoured member of the Midland Sports Hall of Fame who covered Morley’s games for the Midland Free Press. “He was like our own Gordie Howe.” http://www.midlandonsportshalloffame.com/morley-spiker.html 

Three Midland Orphans hockey team players, Morley Spiker has Peterborough Petes jersey, Pit Legault has number 14, the third is Harry Morrison. Coach not pictured is Ed Bolan. December 11th, 1953. 

Three players who have played a big part in the Midland Monarchs of the Intermediate “A” Northern group’s five-game winning streak. Jim Green, Morley Spiker and Marty Desroches. Green and Spiker are forwards, Desroches normally plays defence but is filling in on the right wing for the injured Leo St. Amand. December 24th, 1954. 

Bulging with chicken and banana cream pie, members of the K-W Dutchmen, Legion Branch 80’s entry in the senior OHA division of Midland’s Little NHL, posed for the County Herald camera following a dinner in their honour at Bourgeois’ dining room Tuesday night. The boys are wearing snappy new sweater coats donated by the Legion branch. Also in the picture are Legionnaires Graydon Rodgers, Don Gallivan and President Charlie Scott, along with coach Morley Spiker. March 28, 1958 

Coming up with one of his greatest efforts in a long career, Midland Flyers’ Morley Spiker scored five of his team’s goals in a 6-4 win over Meaford Chevvies here last Wednesday night. Spiker is seen poking the first of his quintet behind goalie Elgin Cubitt while Meaford forward Barney Walmsley (10) rushes in too late to help. Flyers host Collingwood here tonight. January 13th, 1960. (Not the best photo but it shows how Morley got his nickname, the “Haunt”, for the way he was always around his opponents net.”

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – June 7th to 14th, 1957

Click on Photos to Enlarge 

Dr. P. B. Rynard is congratulated by George S. Dudley Q. C. on his victory in the recent federal election, he is our MP for Simcoe East as the Tories return to power after a lapse of 23 years. 

Jubilant group forms outside Conservative Committee rooms in Midland after the full scope of the nationwide victory became apparent. Victorious candidate Dr. P. B. Rynard in the background and others are; Mrs. Percy Hopkins, Mrs. Lily Page of Orillia, Mrs. James Caswell, Mrs. Rynard and Oliver H. Smith. 

Steep stairs at Poll #8, 209 Midland Ave. made it impossible for about half a dozen voters to exercise their franchise during the federal election Monday night. Scrutineeers, Mrs. A. Johnston left and Mrs. Carl Smith said people with poor health or heart conditions were unable to climb the stairs. 

Three weeks before her 90th birthday Mrs. William Preston of Wyebridge cast her vote in Monday’s election. She was born five days after Confederation. When women got the franchise she never missed an election and “voted Conservative every time”. At left is Mrs. Ernie Robbins. 

True to form, Midlander Joe Leeking makes it out to vote on June 10th from his hospital bed at St. Andrews with the help of nurses Ann Desroches and Betty Perry and some crutches. Joe was seriously injured in a car accident on April 23. (My parents and maybe everyone called him “leaky Joe” because he operated a mobile public address service which consisted of large horn shaped loud speakers on top of his car. I remember him driving up our street announcing  events and he was a fixture at the Midland Indians ball games doing the play by play.) 

Wolf Cubs get ready for the hand off during a relay race in Little Lake Park Saturday afternoon. Over 150 youth and leaders took part in the track meet that was won by Third Midland “B” pack led by Mrs. Jack Gardner. 

Challenge Shield for the outstanding Wolf Cub Pack in the district in tests passed, was awarded to Fourth Midland pack (St. Paul’s United Church) during a meet at Little Lake Park Saturday afternoon. The winners are, front row, Murray Drinkle, Bobby French, Roy Mathis, Gary Sharp; middle row, Jimmy Lounsberry, Tom Atkinson, Doug Atkinson, John Cranston. Back row, Cubmaster Bill Brooks, District Commissioner Harvey Boyd and president Rev. R. D. Wright of SGBD. 

Water levels in the Great Lakes are at a low ebb in recent years, the private dock and the government dock in Victoria Harbour are almost out of the water and nearly five feet above it. 

Boathouses along the Sturgeon River are almost useless in the low water along the Great Lakes this year. Cruiser inside is high and dry. Many irate cottagers blame the Chicago “water steal”, but many veteran residents say it is just the natural low ebb of a ten year cycle. 

These Midland bowlers won the Ontario Bowling Association championship for class “B” teams last month. They rolled a total of 3,414 pins in three games to win the Schenley Trophy, and individual cups. Front row; Don Fox, Doug Martin (captain), Dave Emms; back row, Elmer Todd, Tom Boast. A Midland ladies team finished fourth in the same competition. Team members were Marg Ingram, Doreen Hamilton, Bernice Martin, Pearl McIlravey and Alma Marsell. George Ross and Jean Keitel won prizes in mixed bowling, as did Dora Taylor and Joan Gilmore. 

Radio phonograph unit was presented to Jimmy E. Heels on his retirement June 3rd from the CPR. Jimmy has 40 years of service with the CPR and is currently the foreman at the Port McNicoll freight sheds. Kneeling, W. J. Stewart and G. R. Anderson. Standing; John Bridges, Art Bell, S. F. Malin, T. Lewis, E. H. Heels, J. E. Heels, J. Sheehan, W. H. Biggar, S. Thoms, constable John J. Koren and W. A. Paxton. 

The annual public school field day was held at Midland Town Park on June 5th. Junior trophy winner was David Lamb, senior was Gerald Wotherspoon and tied for intermediate boy were Rodger Leclair and David Stainton. Eight new records were set at the meet. 

Winners of trophies in the girls events were, Arlene Staruck and Helen Coombs who tied for senior honours; Lynn McAllen intermediate and Nancy Higgs the junior winner. 

Although he didn’t win the event, David Belsey gave it a good try during the junior high jump event at the Midland Public School’s field day held in the Town Park June 5th. 

Midlander Bruce MacIntosh displays a proud grin as he explains where he caught this six pound rainbow trout while fishing for speckles with a small hook, six pound test line and a worm; “within ten miles of Midland” was all he would say. 

With an eye on a career in aeronautical engineering, Raymond Desrochers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Desrochers, holds the medal presented to him at the University of Ottawa for leading his class. He is taking his matriculation course at Ottawa, and prior to that had shown his scholastic ability at Penetang Public School. 

Mrs. Blanche Bernier, a Sunnyside resident, was one of the many who took advantage of the free chest X ray clinic conducted in Midland, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday by the National Sanitarium Association in co-operation with the Midland Canadian Club, Kitchikewana Chapter IODE and St. Andrew’s Hospital Auxiliary. 

 

 

  • Headline, Free Press Herald, June 12, 1957. “Tories Score Major Win – Rynard is Riding Victor”. Voters Give Orillia Medico Thumping Majority of 2,195; Mayor Parker Runs Fourth.  Comparable to the trend which swept the nation in the federal election Monday, Simcoe East voters swept Progressive-Conservative candidate Dr. P. B. Rynard into office with a thumping over-all majority of 2,195 votes.
  • Headline, County Herald, June 14, 1957. Northern Municipalities Pay Less to CountyShare of the total county levy to be paid by municipalities in the northern end of Simcoe County will be lower in 1958 if the unanimous report of the equalization committee, presented this morning, is accepted by county council as a whole. Major shift concerns Midland whose equalization factor is dropped from 1.2518, in effect for this year’s levy, to 1.18 for 1958. Tax saving may come close $5,000.
  • One of this area’s oldest and most esteemed businessmen, J. W. Bald will be honored at Midland’s Roxy Theatre Monday night in connection with “Father’s Day” ceremonies being staged by manager Al Perkins. In choosing Mr. Bald as the honored guest, Mr. Perkins could hardly make any mistake. Few fathers in the area are better known than Mr. Bald, who operated a photographic studio on King Street for a half-century. Now in his 90th year, Mr. Bald is widely known throughout Canada and the United States through the millions of picture post cards he turned out on 30,000 Island and Georgian Bay scenery. Although he closed his King Street studio some years ago, Mr. Bald still carries on his craft at his Fourth Street home.
  • Peggy Watson daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lorne Watson, Midland, has won, for the second year in succession, a top award in a Toronto swim meet. Peggy won two awards last year and also holds Royal Life Saving Society instructor’s and life saving certificates, obtained while a student at Branksome Hall, Toronto. She is now employed at Eaton’s College Street store.
  • Lloyd Stackhouse of St. John, New Brunswick, has been appointed to Midland YMCA staff it was announced Monday. An experienced YMCA worker, he took the St. John YMCA leaders’ training corps. He is proficient in basketball, tumbling and gymnastics and recently received a teaching certificate from the Teachers College in Fredericton, New Brunswick, where his major training was in physical education.
  • Monday night, Midland councillors gave two readings to a bylaw which would prohibit keeping domestic fowl, cattle, swine, goats, foxes, mink and more than two rabbits within the town limits. They plan to complete the passing of the bylaw in September. Mindful of the prolific reputation of rabbits, a couple of councillors suggested keeping the limit to one instead of two, but no change was made in the wording. It was estimated there are at least a half dozen cows, three or four goats and hundreds of chickens now being kept in the town.
  • Ten Years Ago This Week  A 1,200-pound shipment of food and clothing had been shipped by the citizens of Coldwater and district to aid flood victims in the British Isles. The food and clothing was donated after Coldwater Red Cross branch had issued an appeal to citizens. * ** The CSL freighter Emporer went aground on Canoe Rocks off Isle Royale, broke in two and sank. Twelve crew members, including one woman, the captain and one mate lost their lives. Fog was blamed for the shipping accident. * * * Monsignor J. M. Castex celebrated his 51st anniversary in the priesthood. He left June 4 for Ottawa to take part in the Marian conference. * * * Port McNicoll council and citizens decided to let a Toronto firm develop “Flat Point” into a modern sub-division. The point was re-named Paradise Point by the Toronto firm. * * * The annual meeting of the Townships Religious Education Council was to be held at Wyevale United Church. Rev. H. A. Melloe of Toronto, special representative of the Ontario Religious Education Council, was to be special     * * * Cold, wet weather had delayed seeding operations on district farms. Ontario Department of Agriculture reports revealed that 1939 had been an even wetter spring. * * * Mrs. Edison Doan of Allenwood had been elected president of Simcoe Centre Women’s Institute. The annual meeting of the W.I.’s was held at Edenvale United Church. * * * A native of Medonte Township, Mrs. Dennis Perry of Tupperville, Kent County, celebrated her 102nd birthday. * * * Lorne Watson had been installed as president of Midland Lions Club. John Bridges had been elected president of Midland Y’s Men at a meeting of the club executive.
  • Thieves who broke into Calvert’s grocery store at Port McNicoll early Wednesday morning are reported to have made off with more than $300 worth of tea, sugar and eggs. Tay Township police chief John Magnus said entrance was gained to the basement of the building, used as a store room, through a screen window. Reported stolen were 23 cases of tea, alone valued at over $300, a hundred pounds of sugar and a crate of eggs.
  • Midland Public Utilities employees Monday will commence full-scale installation of water meters in homes throughout the town. At its meeting Tuesday night the PUC approved a motion to hire additional help to complete the work as quickly as possible. Commissioners were told that 15 meters had already been installed on a test run basis. Average installation cost per meter to date was $3.12, the meeting was told. Wages for any additional help will be $1.50 per hour for a man with tools and $1 per hour for his helper, commissioners decided. Faulty shutoffs found in homes will be replaced at cost of labor if the householder provides the materials.
  • From John Power’s “Outdoor Diary” – George Lott caught a rock bass the other day with a four-inch eel clinging to it. This is the first time I have heard of eels on these fish . . . Ross Hart and I were chasing trout in the Hillsdale area last week when we surprised two Canada geese in a marsh. Anyone know whether any of these honkers nest in our area? (Just try to count their off spring now) . . . Chuck Stelter observed a deer crossing Hugel Ave. at Sixth Street the other morning.
  • Wrestling fans of this area, of whom there are legionget their first taste of action for this season at Midland Arena Gardens Monday night, with no less personage than Whipper Billy Watson heading the three bout card. Sponsored by Midland Minor Hockey Association for several seasons now, proceeds from the summer-long events go a long way towards providing hockey during the winter season for boys of bantam, midget and juvenile age. It’s hardly likely that Whipper Bill, long a favorite in Midland, will have to use his dreaded Commando Unconscious hold Monday night to defeat Art Neilson, a newcomer to wrestling in Midland. Watson seldom uses the Commando, even on such dastardly characters as Gene Kiniski. After sampling some of Kiniski’s “holds,” most wrestlers feel justified in using almost anything, including the nearest exit.

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – June 1st to 7th, 1957

Click on Photos to Enlarge 

Photo with Dr. B. P. Rynard, Progressive Conservative candidate for Simcoe East includes Judith Ruth Laity (Mrs. Ken Kiefer), her mother Mrs. G. B. “Bud” (Ilene) Laity and Mrs. Rynard. The event was a tea at the Midland YMCA on Thursday given by the Midland District Women’s Progressive Conservative Association. (Congratulations to Judy on her recent retirement from the Midland Public Library) (The lady to the right of Mrs. Rynard in the background I believe is Mrs. Don (Vida) Bridges.) 

At the closing dinner of Midland’s Little Hockey League at the Georgian Hotel Thursday night the captains of the three winning teams were presented trophies by Harold Butson. Ernie Boast (died Nov 6, 2014, Ottawa ON), left, with the Junior OHA trophy, Ernie Charlesbois the NHL trophy and Barry McIlvarey the AHL, all of the “B” section. 

 Midland has had its share of national political figures during the federal election campaign that is drawing to a close. Friday at the Midland YMCA the ladies committee supporting the Liberal Party held an event attended by Lester B. Pearson, Minister of External Affairs. Mrs. G. E. Tanner, Mrs. Fred H. Bell, Mrs. Charles Onley and Mrs. Frank Hartman (Jean nee Haig). 

 

Golden wedding anniversaries seem to be all the rage in North Simcoe this year, with much more than the usual quota of citizens having achieved a half-century of wedded life. The couple above, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman French, who live on a farm just west of Waverley, marked their anniversary at the home of his sister, Mrs. W. McConnell, in Elmvale May 29. The original wedding service was also held in Elmvale. 

Low water levels of Georgian Bay and the Muskokas is causing considerable financial and operational issues for resort and marina operators. The owner of Duck Bay Camp at Waubaushene, Sid Langley watches as a crane and bucket try to deepen the boat channel into his property, at $16.00 per hour. 

Ski enthusiasts will no longer have to crowd into the tiny shack which served as a chalet at Midland Ski Resorts when next season rolls around. There’ll be plenty of room for everybody in this 90-foot building which used to serve as the community hall at Little Lake Park. Cut in three sections, it was moved to its new site early last week. Plans are also underway to have the building serviced with hydro and water. 

There wasn’t much room for any other traffic as this section of the old community hall from Little Lake tourist camp rolled out Highway 27 early last week. 

Pete Pettersen, Jutta Keylwerth and Keith Bertrand manager of Midland Ski Resorts Ltd. admire a model of the ski jump as it will look this summer during the ski meet on the August holiday weekend. The model was built by Melvin W. Smile of Hamilton. 

Dr. Swan tries on his son John’s new jacket that he and his teammates received Thursday night at dinner in the Georgian Hotel. The team won the junior OHA Ontario Little League final and also received wrist watches. Other players in jackets are Dennis Abbott, Wayne Holden and Bob Weckman. 

Huronia Museum is open again for a new season and one of the first visitors is an avid local historian and Coldwater banker Ken Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton is also the treasurer of the Huronia Historic Sites and Tourist Association. Vic Grigg, a museum staffer, shows Ken an exhibit. 

 No doubt that June was the month for weddings. 

  • Midland Free Press headline June 5th, 1957; Bold Robber Enters Mill Rifles Till at Noon Hour. A daring thief entered Midland Planing Mill yesterday and rifled the cash register while the office staff was home for lunch at noon hour. Planing Mill Manager Frank Bray, who discovered the theft on his return, said the culprit apparently gained entry through a basement door. The front door to the office was locked.
  • County Herald headline June 7th, 1957; 28,446 Eligible To Vote in Simcoe East Riding. A total of 28,446 people are eligible to vote in the four-way contest for Simcoe East Monday. In the 1953 federal election, 72 percent of the 27,479 eligible to vote at that time went to the polls. In 1949, the riding mustered 78 percent of its voters.
  • Four anglers, fishing at the mouth of the Sturgeon River last week, caught four large pickerel. The fish were taken on a variety of plugs, flatfish, pikey-minnow and Canadian wiggler. Lucky anglers were Phil Mahz, Depew, N.Y., Bill Kepnser, Hamburg, N.Y., F. Keenan and son Frank of Sturgeon Bay. The fish weighed 11, 10, 9, and 7 pounds, respectively. (Sports fishing was a major tourist attraction in North Simcoe years ago, with hotels being booked far in advance of season openings. Many of the anglers were Americans. In the opening day photo below many of the cars parked near a popular local stream have New York state licence plates.)
  • Reviewing his firm’s operations in Midland during the past five years, Guenther Leitz, president of Ernst Leitz (Canada) Limited, told his listeners Wednesday night one factor he found disappointing was the inability to induce more Canadians to join the staff. Addressing the fifth anniversary banquet at Parkside Pavilion, Mr. Leitz said the Canadian company had fallen far short of its original intention of employing six Canadians to one German to train them to become tradesmen.
  • A sum of money, estimated to be between $900 and $1,100, said to be Saturday night’s receipts missing from the safe of Penetang’s Hotel Brule, has posed a problem for Penetang Police. A similar amount, receipts from Friday night’s business, still remain in the safe. Loss of the money was discovered by Bernard McDonald, a hotel employee, Sunday afternoon after he had been called at his home by manager Phil Robitaille to investigate the reason no one was on duty at the hotel desk. Police are also searching for Oliver Dyer, 75-year-old desk clerk who was supposed to be on duty at the time.
  • Injured about the face and head when a hydro pole on which he was working broke at Little Lake Park, Midland, Monday morning, Kenneth Walker, 23, was transferred to a Toronto hospital for further examination by a specialist yesterday. Allan Walker, a brother, said Ken had been removing wires from a pole, located in the tent area of the park. Several of the old poles are replaced yearly as a safety measure, Allan said. Many of them, while otherwise sound, are worn thin around the base.
  • Want Ad – For Sale – $18,500 OR OFFER — Owner’s new split-level home with wide picture window overlooking the lake and treed gardens; 29 ft. living room, work-easy kitchen, 3 bedrooms, finished recreation room with fireplace, large insulated attic, heated attached garage, patio, landscaped, air-conditioned, oil heating. 286 Fourth St., phone L A . 6-5840, Midland.
  • Obituaries; A resident of Midland for forty years Mrs. Joseph Cripps died in St. Andrew’s Hospital May 23 following a coronary thrombosis, she was 73. Funeral service was held at A. Barrie and Sons funeral home Monday, May 26, with interment in Lakeview Cemetery, Midland. Rev. W. R. Auld officiated. Pallbearers were Alex Ingram, George Ingram, Marlowe Atkinson, Harold Humphries, Gerald McAvoy and Larry McAvoy. Cripps, the former Margaret Emma McAvoy, was born on the Second Concession, Flos Township Nov 12, 1884, and received her education in Flos and Hillsdale schools. In 1906 she was married to Joseph Cripps in Barrie. After spending several years in Hillsdale she moved to Midland where she continued to reside until her death. On Oct. 3. 1956, Mr. and Mrs. Cripps celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. In a fall three years ago, Mrs. Cripps broke her leg but was able to get around in a wheelchair. Her hobbies consisted of knitting and quilting. She is survived by her husband, four sons, Dalton, Newmarket; Allen, Iron City; Albert, Midland and William, Willowdale; one daughter, Mrs. Lorne Faragher (Goldie), Midland; one sister, Mrs. Robert Humphries of Midland and 11 grandchildren. **** A resident of Midland for more than half a century, Harriet Ellen Bissette died May 10 at St. Andrews Hospital following a short illness. She was 82. The funeral was held May 14 from her residence at 292 Princess Street to St. Margaret’s Church, where Rev. F. Voorwerk celebrated mass, Pallbearers were John Bissette, Paul Bissette, Bernard Goneau, Murray Kearns, Gerald McNamara and Ernie Nicholson. Interment was at St. Margaret’s Cemetery. Born in England in 1875, she came to Haliburton as an infant and there received her education. She and Fred Bissette were married at Lindsay in 1889 and settled in Midland. Mr. Bissette died in 1948. A member of the Roman Catholic Church, Mrs. Bissette was active in church work. As early as 1924 she was a promoter of the Canadian Messenger and was interested in the St. Vincent de Paul Society when it was active here. Mrs. Bissette was the only woman on the Cemetery Board when it was first established. For at least 12 years she was president of the Catholic Women’s League. During the war years she convened for St. Margaret’s on the Red Cross, sewing in the church basement, reported deaths of servicemen to St. Michael’s Cathedral, assisted in blood clinics and at the soldiers’ banquet at the close of the war. *** Funeral service was held Friday, May 31, for Wilfred Martin who died unexpectedly at his Penetang home after suffering a heart seizure. The funeral was held from the Beausoleil funeral home to St. Ann’s Memorial Church where Father J. Kelly, assisted by Father J. Marchand and Father L. McGough, officiated. Pall bearers were Ed. Desrochers, Walter Spearn, Ken Tannahill, Gerard Bourgeois, Bob Stewart and Jos. Desrochers. Interment was in St. Ann’s Cemetery. Born in Penetang, July 17, 1892, Mr. Martin was a bachelor and had spent his entire life here. A butcher by trade, he was well known in town. A Roman Catholic, he was a 3rd degree member of the Knights of Columbus, and a member of the Holy Name Society. Surviving are one brother, James of Montreal; and five sisters. Miss Helen Martin and Miss Loretta Martin, Penetang; Mrs. Ada Bakewell and Mrs. Mary Marshall, Toronto; Mrs. Rose Russell, in North Bay.
  • 25 YEARS AGO –  Masons, Odd Fellows, Orangemen and citizens paid tribute to Arthur Bugg, former mayor of Midland, at funeral services held at his residence. Midland Citizens’ Band headed the funeral cortege to Lakeview Cemetery. * * * Ontario Premier Henry had been served notice to appear as a witness in a Hydro probe which was being conducted by Mr. Justice Orde in Osgoode Hall. * * * Hannah Kennedy, one of the earliest residents of Penetang, died at her home. * * * Miss Hilda McDonald was appointed the superintendent of the Penetang hospital. Her duties were to commence June 1. Mrs. Mac Donnelly, the superintendent of the nursing school, remained in charge until Miss McDonald took over her duties. * * * Captain Robert Dollar, closely identified with Midland’s early days, died at his home in San Rafael, Cal. He was 88. * * * Midland’s lacrosse team was holding down top spot in the district league, after handing Stayner an 11-6 defeat in Stayner.  * * * Midland council had hit a snag in its public works program. Council held a special session to determine how it would finance the work planned for 1932. The problem was left in the hands of a special committee. *** Bessie Lovering of Coldwater, Elizabeth Ruth Carr Topping, Doris A. Trill and Mable Beatrice Baker, all of Midland, formed the graduating class of St. Andrews Hospital School of Nursing. Graduation exercises were held in the YMCA. * * * In a Georgian Bay League fixture, a ball team from  Penetanguishene defeated a Midland YMCA aggregation 17 to 11.
  • Last week at a dinner attended by 325 persons, the management and 150 employees of Ernst Leitz Canada celebrated their fifth birthday in Midland. It was a happy occasion and an important one. In the past five years, Leitz Canada has not only made a major contribution to the up-building of the economy of North Simcoe but has become a by-word all across this nation and throughout the United States for top quality precision optical instruments. The reputation which was once enjoyed exclusively by the parent plant at Wetzlar has now been acquired in no small part by the Midland factory.
  • Preparations for what Pete Pettersen is sure will be the biggest summer ski meet in the world are swinging into high gear. The three-day civic holiday event, which will feature top jumpers from Canada, the United States and Europe could draw as many as 50,000 people to Midland from August 3 to 5, Pete said Monday.
  • Penetang tennis enthusiasts will concentrate on junior membership during this season, says Ted Light, newly named president of the Tennis Club. Miss Helen Dubeau is secretary-treasurer.

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – May 16th to 23rd, 1957

Click on Photos to Enlarge Top group in awards handed out at the 4-H achievement day in Elmvale Saturday was the Vasey Club, four of whose members won county honours. Pauline Irish, Bonnie Bannan, Pauline Robinson and Delcie Edwards. 

Thirty speckled trout were caught in district streams last weekend by former Midland ‘Y’ staffer Hugh McGillicudy, left, and John Power, County Herald outdoors columnist. Beaver ponds proved to be the most prolific source for the “square tails”, three of which would make any trout angler’s mouth water. 

 

The vision of Fatima is represented by this float, one of several in the religious parade which preceded Sunday’s rosary rally in Midland’s Town Park. Sheila Butineau, Judy Lemieux and Roger King represent the three children who saw the vision of the Virgin Mary, portrayed here by Patsy Knicely. 

Hard work has paid off of these girls over the years as each of them won county honour certificates for having completed six 4H homemaking club projects successfully. Miss Ruth Shaver, centre, county home economist for the Ontario Department of Agriculture, presents the awards to Rita Lalonde and Dot Caston, Wyevale; Diane French, Saurin; and Gail Langman, Allenwood. 

 

Mother’s Day has a special meaning for these St. Andrew’s nurses as they unveil a portrait of their teacher Miss Emma Baker who died last Wednesday. Miss Baker was superintendent of St. Andrew’s for more than 30 years. Rena Bell, Mrs. Gertrude Magee, Mrs. Olive Weeks, Mrs. Isobel Jones, Mrs. W. Leatherdale, who unveiled the portrait, Mrs. R. Simpell, Mrs. James Clarkson, Miss Jean Holt, Mrs. Glady Reid and Mrs. H. (Ann) Humphries. The portrait was painted by Harry Willis. 

 

Mobile shopping for patients at St. Andrew’s Hospital is a popular feature provided by the Hospital Auxiliary. Here Miss Margaret Johnston, J. H. McGill, John Calhoun and Mrs. Ernie Nicholson form a happy group around the cart. 

 

 

 

  • The headline, Midland Free Press, Wednesday, May 15th, 1957; “MIDLAND MAYOR FOURTH CANDIDATE, SEEKS ELECTION AS AN INDEPENDENT” Simcoe County is to have a four-way federal contest June 10th. The latest candidate to throw his hat in the ring —and it is no small hat — is Midland’s mayor for the past seven years, 46-year-old Charles Parker. The holder of the Mayor’s chair in Midland for the longest period in the history of the town and with a year at county council as deputy-reeve before that, Mr. Parker has spent nine of his 46 years in municipal office. Born in Tiny Township at Wyebridge, he was orphaned before he entered his teens. His father, William Parker, farmer and gospel preacher of Wyebridge, died when Charlie was nine, and his mother Celia Buchanan, died a year later. He was raised by his uncle Jack Buchanan of Moonstone, where he went to public and continuation school. Rejected for military service because of the effects of an attack of infantile paralysis at the age of three, Mr. Parker served during World War II in the Connaught Laboratories, Toronto, on army research work for which he drew army pay. He is the only one of eleven local polio cases Contracted in 1914 still alive.
  • The headline, County Herald, Friday, May 17th, 1957; “FIRST VOTE IN FORTY-TWO YEARS, ‘WETS’ GAIN 62 PERCENT EDGE” Midland electors Wednesday decided to end the town’s “dry” status in a vote that drew approximately 70 percent of those eligible to cast ballots. The “wet” forces scored their victory by an edge of 62 percent for a government-controlled retail liquor store and by 61.95 per cent for a brewers’ warehouse. At least 60 percent of the total vote was required.
  • A Victoria Harbour longshoreman narrowly missed being buried alive while unloading grain from the S.S. Georgian Bay at the CPR elevator in Port McNicoll Monday afternoon. Lloyd Russell was reported in “satisfactory” condition at St. Andrews Hospital in Midland yesterday, and his doctor said preliminary examination had not disclosed any fractures. Russell, whose usual occupation is farming, had apparently been working in the hold of the ship while the ‘leg’ which transfers the grain into the elevator was in operation. He was reported to have sunk in grain up to his chin.
  • Canada’s first summer ski jump competition will be held in Midland Civic Holiday weekend, August 3, 4, 5. What was originally a fond dream of Pete Pettersen now will be a reality. An exploratory trip to Lake Placid, home of New York State’s summer ski jump, proved that it can be done. Arrangements have now been completed by Midland Resorts Ltd. to purchase machinery that will produce sufficient quantities of ice and snow to assure ideal skiing conditions.
  • Midland Junior Chamber of Commerce will again stage a monster display of fireworks in Little Lake Park, May 20. John Gerow, chairman of the Jaycee fireworks committee, said the display would be held along the beach area east of the park boathouse. John Gianetto is treasurer of the committee and Frank Swales and Bruce Gilbert will be in charge of firing the displays. Mr. Gerow said financial assistance had been received from Branch 80, Canadian Legion, from Midland council ($50), and that Y’s Men had promised to help.
  • Probably the most enthusiastic persons present to greet Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent when he visits Penetang tomorrow afternoon will be Cubs, Scouts, Brownies and Guides who will form a guard of honour from Main Street into the centre of Memorial Park, where a stand has been erected. The special plane flight is to arrive at Camp Borden about 11 a.m. Thursday, and from there the Prime Minister and his party will be brought to Penetang by motor cavalcade.
  • Plans for a gala garden party, which will mark the official opening of Fort Penetanguishene Officers’ Quarters Museum June 26, were launched when committee members met Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Alvin Gropp. Arts and crafts, including weaving, spinning, quilting and pottery, will be on display. There will also be a sale of candy, cookies and home-made baking. Refreshments have been arranged by the Ladies of St. Anns and the Catholic Women’s League under the joint chairmanship of Mrs. H. Picotte and Mrs. Fred DeVillers. Costumes are under the chairmanship of Mrs. W. H. Morrison.
  • Fill, sand, gravel, topsoil, top dressing hauled; grading lawns, general lawn maintenance; sodding, trees removed, lots cleared. Bruce Tinney, phone LA. 6-2193. Midland.
  • Midland – Penetang young people’s group of Alcoholics Anonymous will meet in the basement of the Penetang library every Sunday evening at 8.30 p.m. (?)
  • WEDDING; At St. Margaret’s rectory April 22, Katherine May France, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred France of Franceville, was united in marriage to Guy Reginald Johnstone, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Johnstone of Midland. Rev. M. Beriault officiated.
  • TEN YEARS AGO THIS WEEK; Christian Island Indians, under the direction of Indian Agent Henry Gauthier, planted 140,000 trees on the island. * * * Wilfrid W. Jury, University of Western Ontario archaeologist, supervised the erection of a Huronian totem at the Sturgeon Bay store of R. Thomson. * * * Two large American-owned steamships were to make calls at Midland during the summer. The ships were “The City of Cleveland III”, said to be the biggest on the lakes, and “Western States.” * * * Early pilgrimages had been made to Martyrs’ Shrine by groups from Toronto and Guelph parishes. Fifteen novices from Guelph Novitiate were at the shrine, assisting with preparations for the summer activities. * * * George Mead of Penetang was installed as president of a new ball club which was being organised In Penetang. Alvin Gropp was named the honorary president. * * * Coldwater council decided to employ men to clean up garbage which had been tossed along the bank of the river in the village and to enforce the bylaw forbidding the practice. * * * Despite heavy winter snows and spring rains water levels in Lake Huron and Georgian Bay was quite low. Beach areas in Tiny had been increased considerably by the receding water level. * * * From a peak of more than 500, jobless total in the Midland Penetang district had dropped to 140, 50 of which were over-age and classed as unemployable’s.
  • W. G. Alexander of the Ontario Fire Marshal’s department has recommended that Midland council purchase a 65-foot aerial ladder truck for the town’s fire department. Mr. Alexander’s recommendation was contained along with a number of others in a report submitted by Fire Chief Arnold Tippin and read to council Monday night.
  • The presence of mind of a Midland woman, Mrs. J. T. Payette, yesterday avoided what might have been a serious accident, while Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent was being transported back to Camp Borden to catch a plane to London. Mrs. Payette was the owner of a car which was sideswiped by another on Highway 90 about one mile east of Essa. Passengers in her car included the Prime Minister, Wm. A. Robinson, Liberal candidate for Simcoe East, and one of the P.M.’s secretaries.
  • Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – May 24th to 31st, 1957


    Click on Photos to EnlargeFor more than four decades William Steer’s bass voice has been a fixture in the choir of Midland’s Knox Presbyterian Church. His four daughters and son have also sung in the choir at various times, and granddaughter Patsy Steer at right is carrying on the tradition. Mrs. Arthur McElroy at the piano has also served as a junior choir leader for two years. Mr. Steer is the head millwright at Midland Simcoe Elevator where he has worked for 33 years. 

     Proud of the plaque they were awarded at South Georgian Bay District Scout camp over the weekend are members of Fox Patrol, 1st Midland Troop. Tom Gordanier, Murray Mostyn, Paul Downer, Doug Faint, Bill Howard, Ross Clute (patrol leader) and Ken Cleary. The plaque was presented during visitor’s day ceremonies at the Sturgeon River camp site. 

    Group photo of the Scout Camp during visitor’s day.

     Winners of the Midland YMCA floor hockey league this year were the Mustangs, seen receiving the Unamotus Trophy from Ken Mackie president of the Unamotus Hi-Y Club. The trophy was awarded on a basis of teamwork and attendance, as well as on league standings. Left to right are, Bob Strickland, Gerald Karch, Dave Carpenter, Jerry Beteau, Ken Mackie, Neil Murday, Randy Knapp and Bob Weckman. The boys were also presented with crests, saw a movie and were stuffed with ice cream and cake.

     

     “Knots and bends” are still an important part of naval cadet training as Chief Petty Officer Doug Ladoucer and Ordinary Cadets Jim McKinnon and M. Light discovered when inspected by Lieutenant Commander J. R. H. Ley of Hamilton during a recent inspection of RCSCC Huron. 

     

    North Simcoe Women’s Institutes re-elected their entire slate of officers at the annual meeting in North River United Church May 22. In the front row, left to right, are secretary-treasurer Mrs. M. C. Long of Waubaushene, third vice-president Mrs. Ernest Ayers of Jarratt, first vice-president Mrs. Beverley Walker of Eady; back row: second vice president Mrs. Ed Sallows of Warminster, area chairman Mrs. G. R. Lane of Coldwater and president Mrs. Lloyd Dunlop of Moonstone. 

    Donors are needed for the “walking blood bank” at St. Andrew’s Hospital as even this modern refrigerating unit can only keep stored whole blood three weeks. Lab technician Bill Zinck reports that human donors reduce waste by making blood available only when needed. 

     

    • The headline, Midland Free Press, Wednesday, May 29th, 1957; Leitz Company Awards Contract for 11,500 Square Foot Addition. Coincident with the celebration of the fifth anniversary of the firm’s establishment in Canada, Guenther Leitz, president of Ernst Leitz (Canada) Limited today announced the construction of an 11,500 square foot addition to the company’s Midland plant. A contract for the new building, which will be 50 percent larger than the original plant built five years ago, has been awarded to Alfred Rei, a Midland contractor.
    • The headline, County Herald, Friday, May 31st, 1957; Cadi Levies Heavy Fines on Pair Nabbed at Liquor Party at Beach. “Police Search Two Cabins Find 22-Pint Beer Cache, Several Cases of Empties.” Magistrate K. A. Cameron again served ample notice in Penetang court Thursday that he intends “to carry out his threat, announced last week, of cracking down on illegal drinking at North Simcoe beaches again this year”. Two Toronto lads, both 18, were assessed a total of $99.50 each in fines and costs after being found guilty on charges of obtaining liquor while under the legal age of 21 years.
    • A member of a group of men and women largely associated with the early growth of Midland, and an ardent supporter of municipal progress, Martha Grant Pratt died here Sunday in her 79th year. She was the widow of the late David S. Pratt of 286 Fifth Street. A private funeral service conducted by Rev. J. L. Self of Knox Presbyterian Church was held Tuesday afternoon at A. Barrie and Sons funeral home. Pallbearers were W. A. McGill, G. C. Bennett, Wm. A. Robinson, Dr. Churchill Swan, Dr. A. H. Pinchin and John Pinchin. Interment was at Lakeview Cemetery.
    • Construction work, which started recently on an extension to the main floor of Penetang Legion building, will double the size of the present hall, according to Orval Ambeau, chairman in charge of the work. The addition, 57 by 50 feet, is being added to the rear of the present building, which was the residence of Dr. Nettleton before the Legion purchased it. Plans call for a new kitchen with modern equipment, new washroom, cloakroom, and other facilities for a large hall. The present hall will be completely redecorated to match the interior of the new portion, and a new hardwood floor will extend throughout.
    • Ten Years Ago This Week – Members of Georgian Bay Flying Club marked the first runway for their field, midway between Penetang and Midland. *** Finance Minister Abbott had set a limit of $10 in American currency to be held by Canadians. Previously it was permissible to hold $100. *** Monthly production of creamery butter and cheddar cheese in Ontario showed an increase in butter production and a decrease in cheese stocks. *** Rev. A. C. Stewart, D.D., of Knox Presbyterian Church, Midland, was among guest speakers at the diamond jubilee of Barrie Presbyterial of the Women’s Missionary Society celebrated in Orillia Presbyterian Church. *** Rev. George W. Dorey, D.D., of Toronto preached at St. Paul’s United Church for the Midland High School cadets annual church parade. *** Plans were made for expanding two Orillia schools. The move was forced by increased population and crowded classrooms. * * * The S.S. “Athabasca” was sold to the Steel Company of Canada. It was towed to Hamilton and broken up for scrap metal.
    • On May 31 the University of Montreal will confer an honorary degree of “doctor of laws” on Wilfrid W. Jury. The event is of no small consequence not only to the University of Western Ontario which he serves as curator of its Museum of Indian Archaeology and Pioneer Life, to Huronia whose historical resources he has both explored and developed, but to the people of this entire land.
    • All persons 12 years and over in Midland will be given the opportunity of having free chest X-rays during a community survey by the National Sanitarium Association, June 11, 12, and 13. The unit will be located in Loblaws parking area and will be in operation from 2 to 9 p.m.
    • Penetang Chamber of Commerce, Tuesday night, named George Kerr president for the ensuing year. The vice-president is Ed Webster, and secretary-treasurer will be Ken Macdonald. Chairmen named to head the committees were: finance, Les Gumb; industry, Chas. Sweet; tourist and publicity, M. F. Bellehumeur; merchants, Geo. Mead; history, J. M. H. McGuire and W. H. Morrison; agriculture, Ted Annand; membership, Bill Belrose.
    • Leases for a selected group of lots on Christian Island for summer cottage purposes are being taken up at a satisfactory rate, according to J. Sheane, the Indian Agent at the Island Reservation (now Beausoleil First Nation). The announcement of the band’s decision to lease lots for this purpose was first made in this newspaper last summer. Since that time some 37 agreements have been signed, according to the agent. He said this rate is satisfactory, as the amount of work involved in opening up the section will not allow the whole area to be leased in a short time.
    • On June 12, the telephone system in Honey Harbour and District will be cut over to dial operations, H. A. Kilroy, Bell Telephone manager for this region, announced this week. The change will be made at 7.30 a.m. when calling has reached a low ebb and will be carried out in less than two minutes. The changeover will be made according to a closely co-ordinated procedure which requires split-second timing. With the changeover, all Honey Harbour and district telephone numbers will be changed. New ones will consist of the exchange name and numeral, PLaza 6, -and four other figures. A typical Honey Harbour number would be PLaza 6-1234, or 756-1234.
    • Charles Godfrey, who was born and raised on the outskirts of Coldwater, fell 65 feet to his death May 28 from a Lands and Forests lookout tower west of Nipigon. A report from Beardmore stated Mr. Godfrey, 66, suffered a heart seizure as he climbed to the top of the MacDiarmid tower. His wife, Margaret, climbing a few feet below him, looked up when he did not answer her conversation and saw him slumped between the rungs. Unable to help him on the open ladder, she hurried down with intentions of running over a mile for help. As she stepped away from the ladder, her husband fell.
    • Hand Lawn-Mowers Sharpened, 304 PRINCESS STREET, Midland, Lorne Corbett.
    • A Committee of Midland Ladies Cordially invites you and your friends of the Georgian Bay Area to meet and have tea with Honourable L. B. “Mike” Pearson Secretary of State for External Affairs and William “Bill” Robinson Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons Midland YMCA on Friday, May 31, 2 – 4 p.m. Everyone is Most Welcome to Attend!
    • An invitation is extended to you to meet Dr. P. B. Rynard Progressive Conservative Candidate for Simcoe East and Mrs. Rynard at a Tea to be held Thursday, May 30, from 3 – 6 p.m. in the YMCA Parlor, Midland. Given by the Midland District Women’s Progressive Conservative Association.

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – May 7th to 15th, 1957

Click on Photos to Enlarge An overheated unlined chimney is considered the cause of this Saturday morning fire that destroyed the top two stories of the home of CNR railwayman J. F. Langevin at 154 (now 166) Fifth Street.  Fifteen firemen battled this blaze for three hours but only the furniture on the first floor was saved, there were no injuries and the loss is estimated at $7,000.00. The family has been taken in by son in law Pat Moreau on Sixth Street. Large crowds toured the new Bell Telephone building on Hugel Ave. last week during a three-day open house. Young Donald Atkinson is seen getting some pointers on cable construction from Tom Brodeur. Donald is the son of Mrs. Atkinson, in the photo, and Ross Atkinson who live just across the corner from the new building. 

“My feet are killing me” was the general complaint of these young ladies after they escorted hundreds of visitors on tours of the new Bell Telephone building on Hugel Ave. during the three-day open house last week. Midland manager H. A. Kilroy, seen tallying up the total which came to over 600, was glad to sit down when it was all over. Receptionists are Mrs. Marie Miller, Miss Verna Lambie, Mrs. M. Kennedy, Miss Donna Brandon, Mrs. A. Gauthier and Miss Yvonne Leblanc. 

 

Wayne Holden gets a hit as Little League baseball got underway in Midland Saturday. This action took place on the three diamonds at Parkview School. Games were also being played at Regent School, Town and Little Lake Park. 

A big event in most secondary schools each spring is the annual inspection of the cadet corps. Major W. C. Setterington is seen with a group of cadet officers as they prepare for the MPDHS inspection on May 16th. Cadet Major Bob Deakos, Cadet Major Bob Megaw, Major Setterington, Cadet Lieut. Col. Dean Nicholls commanding officer, Cadet Major Dennis Murphy, Cadet Major Ken MacEachern and Cadet Adjutant John Hilliard. 

 

 

 

Midland Huronias Soccer team has won both of their games this year in the Barrie & District Soccer League. They are pictured here during the halftime of a game against the New Lowell Rangers which they won 5-0 Tuesday. Members of the team not in order are Ernst Schneider, Allan Sparks, Peter Van Velden, Wili Schwarz, Andy Clapperton, Karl Lehr, Horst Gatzek, Bill Rittershofer, Wolfgang Jaenisch, Harry Weber, Horts Sorensen and Gunder Raab-Faber. 

Vast new addition to the Midland Industries plant on Elizabeth Street as viewed from Hugel Ave. Steel is up and the roof is going on this 42,000 square foot addition at a cost of $285,000.00. 

Included in the contest was a written test of 50 questions, one-half of which required choosing one from several printed answers to each question, and the other half being a straight “true or false” proposition. Lloyd Bourgeois came out on top with 403 out of a possible 500 points. Terry Dumais was second with 392 and Ken Arbour placed third with 388. All are 18 years old. 

  • SAY WOODS TINDER DRY – BANS PERMITS FOR FIRES, headline, Free Press, Wednesday, May 8th, 1957. Warning that tinder-dry woods throughout North Simcoe and South Muskoka districts have reached an extremely high forest fire hazard condition. Major G. R. Lane of Coldwater, forester for the Severn River Management Unit, yesterday told this newspaper that no fire permits will be issued until after the next heavy rain. He said Lands and Forests firefighting personnel had already been called out to fight five fires, one Friday, May 4, and four Sunday. One of the four fires, which they battled Sunday, burned down the headquarters building of a summer resort on Morrison Lake, north of the Severn River. He said another fire in the Honey Harbour area Sunday was started by boys who were shooting off firecrackers. About 10 Acres were burned over before it was extinguished.
  • 6.74 INCREASE IN INDUSTRIAL LEVY – RESIDENTIAL RATE CUT 6.32 MILLS, headline, County Herald, Friday, May 10th, 1957. Residential taxpayers of Penetang will find their tax bills somewhat lower this year, while industries and commercial taxpayers are faced with an increase. The figures were determined when council set the 1957 budget at a special meeting Wednesday night. Public School supporters in the Residential class will pay 82.87 mills while industrial and commercial assessments will have a levy of 93.23 mills, a differential of 10.36 mills. Protestant Separate School residential taxpayers have a rate of 79.58 mills with commercial and industry set at 89.94. The differential is the result of unconditional grants announced this year by the provincial government and specified for the benefit of residential taxpayers only.
  • Ontario Department of Lands and Forests reforestation crews last week were at work in county forests on Crown lands in the Severn River management unit. Officials said about 660,000 trees are to be planted by the crews this spring.
  • More than 3,000 persons from North Simcoe district and as far distant as Toronto are expected to attend the second annual Roman Catholic rosary rally in Midland Town Park Sunday. The rally will be preceded by a parade of school children, Cubs, Scouts, Guides and lay organizations representing the seven parishes of the Huronia district, including Lafontaine, Perkinsfield, Penetang, Port McNicoll, Victoria Harbour, Waubaushene and Midland. Accompanying the procession will be St. Mary’s Boys’ Band of Toronto. The parade will form up at St. Margaret’s Church and proceed along Third to Bay, along Bay to King, and south on King to the Town Park.
  • The refreshment booth, operated by John Deakos in Little Lake Park, Midland, was entered early Monday morning by youths, who took merchandise and cash amounting to about $10, Police Chief Robert Cameron said yesterday. The chief said the building was entered about 2 a.m. Monday. The theft was discovered by Constables Ray Atkinson and Ed Armstrong while they were on patrol about 6 a.m. Using a telephone headpiece they yanked off the wall of a nearby pay telephone, the youths gained entry by breaking the large east window. A few large bottles of soft drinks, several cartons of gum, several packages of cigarettes and 60 cents in cash were taken. One youth, a juvenile, who went to a Midland doctor’s office Monday night to have a cut finger dressed, was later questioned by police. The lad, already facing additional theft charges, will also face charges of theft and willful damage. (Maybe sitting at home playing video games isn’t so bad after all.)
  • Typical of the ladies who will be guests of manager Al Perkins at a special “Mother’s Day” program at the Roxy Theatre Monday night is Mrs. Eliza Bath. Now in her 88th year, Mrs. Bath is one of Midland’s oldest living mothers, if not the oldest. Mrs. Bath, and all Midland mothers of any age will be admitted to the Roxy and Drive-In theatres free of charge Monday night. Born near Sunderland Dec. 5, 1869, Mrs. Bath was the former Eliza Calhoun, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. George Calhoun. There were eight children in the Calhoun family, only three of whom are still living. In addition to Mrs. Bath, there are two brothers, John, who has been a patient in St. Andrews Hospital for many months, and George of Beeton. Mrs. Bath’s life has not been an easy one. She came to North Simcoe as a girl of nine, when her father bought a farm between Coldwater and Waubaushene. Her mother died on Eliza’s 15th birthday, and the young girl had already been working in Jim Ryan’s Denison House hotel in Coldwater for some time. Eliza Calhoun came to Midland when she was 20, where she found employment in the home of the late Mr, and Mrs. Fred Jeffery, one of the town’s pioneer hardware merchants. A year later she married Frederick James Bath, who died many years ago. Mr. Bath, a bricklayer, was a member of another pioneer Midland family and a brother of Tom Bath, still a familiar figure on Midland streets. Following her husband’s death, Mrs. Bath went to Toronto to work, returning to Midland about 10 years ago. Although she still has many relatives in Midland, including all six of her eight children who are still living, Mrs. Bath prefers to live alone, in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Campbell, 293 Midland Ave. “This way I can get up when I please and go to bed when I please, without disturbing anybody,” said Mrs. Bath. “Not that I sit idle for very long. I still like to do a bit of crocheting, quilting or knitting, and I get my own meals,” she told this reporter. Two of her sons, both veterans of   World War I, have passed on, John Wesley Bath only recently at Sunny brook Hospital, Toronto. Albert also died from the effects of war wounds many years ago at Mimico. Surviving are three sons, Arthur, James and Stewart, and three daughters, Mrs. Violet Blair, Mrs. William Best (Evelyn), and Mrs. James Offord (Margaret), all of Midland. Mrs. Bath needs never lack company. In addition to her six living children, she has 35 great grandchildren and 27  grandchildren, “Enough for a good picnic.” said her daughter, Mrs. Offord.
  • The remaining 20 building lots in Midland’s federal-provincial land assembly project in the Wireless Hill area are being offered for sale to both builders and prospective homeowners it was announced today by R. H. Sprague, manager of the Orillia Loans Office of the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Mr. Sprague stated that, through a revision of the subdivision plan, frontages of 13 of the Iots has been increased to 56 feet, the remaining seven lots have 50-foot frontages. Selling prices to prospective homeowners have been set at $200 and $240, depending on the size of the lot,  while prices to builders will be $400 and $480. In the case of a sale to a builder, however, half of the purchase price will be refunded where the selling price of the house erected does not exceed an amount established by CMHC, Mr. Sprague said.
  • A rather unenviable record was set in Midland during the month of April, members of Midland Fire Department learned at their May meeting last week. Records showed a total of 34 fires occurred during the month, the most within the memory of even the oldest members. Attending this large number of fires meant a great deal of lost time from their regular jobs by the volunteer section of the brigade.
  • OBITUARIES: Funeral service for Honoré Thanasse was held Friday, April 26, from the Beausoleil funeral home, Penetang, to Ste. Croix Church, Lafontaine, where Rev. T. Marchildon officiated. Interment was in Ste. Croix Cemetery. Pallbearers were Nap Hamelin, James Hamelin, Robert Maurice, Sr., Ligourie Robillard, Jos. Bazinet and Patrick Moreau. Born in Lafontaine 82 years ago, Mr. Thanasse had lived there until he moved to Penetang 11 years ago. His wife, the former Marie Brunelle, whom he married in Lafontaine in 1899, predeceased him nine years ago. Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Leone Grenier, Penetang; Mrs. Irma McConnell, Sudbury; Mrs. Germaine King, London, and Mrs. Marie Moran, Montreal. There are seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. (Not a surname I was familiar with, checking Ancestry.ca I found that Honoré was the only boy of a family of six and his father Louis was one of only two boys in a family of eight. There seem to be only six families with that surname in Simcoe County presently.) * * * THOMAS BOYER a resident of Penetang for the past 20 years, died April 25 at his home. Funeral service was held April 29 from his daughter’s home in Penetang, with Rev. Marc Boyer (nephew of Mr. Boyer) conducting the service, assisted by Rev. J. Kelly and Rev. L. McGough. Interment was in St. Ann’s Cemetery. Pallbearers were six nephews, Julien Gignac, Thomas Gignac, Homer Gignac, Louis P. Brunelle, Benoit Dupuis and Robert Gignac. Mr. Boyer was born in 1877 at Lafontaine and was educated there. In 1907 he married Florella Gignac at Lafontaine. He resided there until moving to Penetang 20 years ago. A member of the Roman Catholic Church, he belonged to the Holy Name Society. Besides his wife, he is survived by daughters, Mrs. Olive Martin, Mrs. Lucrece Bourassa and Augusta Boyer, all of Penetang and sons, Roger of Toronto, Albert and Peter of Kapuskasing and Thomas, Jr., of Essex. One daughter, Georgette, predeceased him in 1948. **** Funeral services will be held tonight at 7 p. m. in St. Paul’s United Church for Miss Emma Baker, who served as superintendent of St. Andrews Hospital for 30 years. Miss Baker died in St. Andrews Wednesday in her 83rd year. A resident of Midland most of her life, Miss Baker operated a millinery shop with her sister prior to going to Montreal to train as a nurse. Following her graduation at Royal Victoria Hospital, she was made supervisor of two large wards in the hospital. Later she engaged in special nursing in California, returning here on the invitation of the Midland Hospital Board to become superintendent of the Midland – Penetang Marine Hospital. When St. Andrews Hospital was established she and her staff moved to the new building.
  • TEACHER WANTED; Go-Home Bay, S.S. No. 2 Gibson Township, one-room school, about 10 pupils, in a Catholic community. Apply giving qualifications, etc. to Mrs. R. C. Sharp, 67 Glengowan Road. Toronto.
  • SELF-CONTAINED, unfurnished cottage on Reinbird Street. Immediately available, $28 monthly includes hydro and water. Apply Denison Hotel, Coldwater.
  • 25 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK; Hon. William Finlayson announced that a township in Northern Ontario had been named after Midland’s fourth term mayor, J. B. Roebuck. The distinction was conferred on the mayor by the Department of Northern Development. * * * Five freighters carrying more than one million bushels of grain pulled into Midland harbour. The five arrived within a four-hour period, four of them docking at Midland Simcoe elevator and the fifth at Aberdeen. * * * Second major fire within a few weeks, destroyed Hillsdale homes owned by Val Kitchen, the Misses C. and M. Turner, and Charles Faragher and a garage owned by Fred Arksey. Both Midland and Barrie fire brigades were called to keep the blaze in check and safeguard other homes and businesses which were being threatened by flying embers. * * * Barking of their dog at 2.30 a.m. sounded a grim warning to Mr. and Mrs. J. McVeigh and family of Port McNicoll. They awakened to find the house filled with smoke and flames sweeping through the ground floor. They fled in their night attire. * * * Fourteen Midland High School students had attained first class honours in their Easter exams. They were Hugh Lloyd, Dorothy Roebuck, Betty Tatham, Stanley Symington, Edna Seymour, Maxwell Perry, Evelyn McKinnon, Ruth Morris, Italy Gianetto, Phyllis Symington, Gladys McGill, Florence McDougall, Ruby Case and Marcia Simkins.
  • Honey Harbour is rapidly becoming an international convention centre. Didace Grisé, the proprietor of Delawana Inn, reveals there are 21 major conventions scheduled for the Delawana at present and several others are negotiating for accommodation.

Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – May 1st to 7th, 1957


Click on Photos to Enlarge

 Amiable Robbie Thompson of Sturgeon Bay can be a very dour Scot when it comes to the sea lamprey, scourge of sport fishing in Georgian Bay. He’s seen here holding three of the eels he caught in the Department of Lands and Forests weir on the Sturgeon River. 

Hundreds of Lamprey Eels have been captured in this Lands & Forest weir on the Sturgeon River. They threaten the existence of sport fishing in Georgian Bay. Robbie Thompson who tends the weir is seen inspecting his catch.

 An award of appreciation is presented to Midland CIBC bank manager R. G. Gillies by Capt. Ray Smith of the Salvation Army for 14 years service as treasurer of the Red Shield appeals in North Simcoe. The presentation was made at a Kiwanis Club meeting.

 League director, Rev. Len Self and team captain Chester Graham beam as they receive the LHL Jr. A Trophy. Captain Jim Stanfield of the losing team, “Babe” Schultz of Collingwood, Keith Carruther Port Hope Ontario LHL vice-president, Keith Kirby Collingwood recreational director and the manager of Toronto Twp. team are the others in the photo.

 These Midland lads had plenty to cheer about when they arrived home from Collingwood with the G. M. Graham Trophy and the junior “A” championship in the Ontario LHL playdowns for the second successive year. It’s hard to say which gave them the biggest thrill, winning the cup or the ride on the fire truck through Midland streets. 

 Veteran linotype operator at Midland Printers Limited, Charles Goodfellow celebrated his 68th birthday April 30. Mr. Goodfellow first started to work on the paper in the summer of 1898. In June of that year, his father, the late J. F. Goodfellow, and his Uncle Charlie bought the Free Press. 

A young man from Waverley and a Huron county girl who met by chance in far-off Brandon, Man., many years ago, marked their golden wedding anniversary in Midland last Wednesday. They were Mr. and Mrs. Roy French, and the roomful of flowers in their home at 322 King Street was ample evidence of the esteem which this couple has earned over the years.  In fact, all but a few months of their 50 years of wedded life has been spent in Midland. Born at Waverley Nov. 28, 1880, Roy French went to school there and worked on his late father’s farm until 1900. Then he decided to become a carpenter and spent two years learning the rudiments of this trade under the late Joseph Davenport. The “going” wage for young would-be-carpenters in the early days of the century was 12 cents per hour, for a 10-hour day. Realising his early education had been of a limited nature, the young apprentice attended the night school then in operation at the Midland YMCA. For three years, from 1902 to 1904 he studied drawing and mathematics, both of which were a big help in his later career. From carpentry, Mr. French went to Midland Engine Works, where he learned the rudiments of pattern making. In 1905 he joined the many young men who were taking Horace Greeley’s advice by heading west. He obtained a job in the Brandon Machine Works. About this time a young lady also decided to see what the west had to offer. She was Agnes Barbara McNeill, a native of Hullett Township, in northern Huron County. Eventually, Agnes and Roy met in Brandon and in the spring of 1907 were married. Back in Midland after his three years in the west, Mr. French found employment in the foundry department of the Canada Iron Corporation, where he remained until 1913, at which time the smelter shut down. Then followed a brief period with the Benson and Bray firm. But with the outbreak of World War I, Mr. French found himself back with his old employers Midland Engine Works. They were making 6-inch shells at the works and Mr. French started off as an inspector. Later he became the night foreman and eventually general foreman of the No. 1 plant. After the war, Mr. French moved around the bay to Sunnyside, to the Great Lakes Foundry and Machine Shop, operated by W. W. Nicholson. He remained with Mr. Nicholson until the latter’s death in 1937. In the spring of 1938, Mr. French took over the Nicholson business, which has carried on ever since under the name of Great Lakes Boat and Machine Co. Up until five years ago, Mr. and Mrs. French lived at 17 Ottawa Street. They have resided at 322 King Street since that time. Mr. French is perhaps best known in Midland through his connection with Calvary Baptist Church. A member of the church since 1903, he has subsequently served on the board of deacons for more than 40 years, and for more than a quarter century was the superintendent of the Sunday School. Mr. French’s long service to Calvary was fittingly marked a year or so ago when the new addition to the church was officially opened. Although he served for two years as an alderman during the hard times of the early 30’s, Mr. French has never taken too keen an interest in party politics. “I have been guilty of voting for either party upon occasion,” Mr. French admitted. He admitted, too, that he was very fond of sport In his younger days, particularly baseball. He played on a number of teams back in the days when Town Park was a busy place all through the summer, with numerous “town league” clubs In action. Mr. and Mrs. French have one son, Alden, manager of Great Lakes Boat and Machine Co. Ltd. and two daughters, Mrs. J. E. Ayers (Florence), of Windsor, and Helen, a graduate of St. Andrews Hospital who takes and active part in the family business. There are also one granddaughter and six grandsons.  

Admiring a bed of bright red tulips on the lawn of Mrs. A. Irish, 335 Manley Street is Patsy Beatty, 4 year-old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Ken Beatty. 

School, church, home, during a century of existence this old building in Waubaushene finally fell to the wrecker’s hammer early this week. After several years use as a school it was the place of worship for Waubaushene Protestants until the Dodge Lumber Company built the nearby Memorial Church in 1881. 

Open house at Port McNicoll Public School. Little Kent Biggar, 8, has his work inspected by his dad Ted Biggar who is chairman of the school board in Port. Mom and sister Debra, 5, look on. 

Something extra at the Port McNicoll Public School open house was a display of oil paintings by 11 year old student Bobby Duncan. Last winter he took his first lessons in oil from Duncan Armbrest of Midland. Pictured are Mrs. Duncan, Douglas 8, Bobby, Mr. Armbrest and father Bruce Duncan. 

 

 

 

  • Free Press headline Wednesday, May 1, 1957, “Rifle-Toting Youths Wound Dogs Shoot Glass Out Of Window Panes”.  A letter read to council by Clerk W. H. Hewson, Mrs. F. L. Chilcott, Dufferin Street, complained of missiles striking her home and that her pet dog had died of wounds. Mrs. Chilcott said windows in her home had been broken by bullets, and slugs had lodged in the outside walls. Pete Lepage  present at the meeting, voiced his complaint stating that he knew of three or four dogs that had been wounded presumably from .22 calibre bullets. Mr. Lepage further stated it had been necessary several times for he and his men to quit work at his marine railway on the west side of Penetang Bay because bullets were whistling around their heads. “I know that youngsters are firing rifles from around Beck’s yard, and they’re firing out over the bay. I understand high-powered .22’s have a range of at least a mile. It’s only one-half mile across the bay to my property, and those bullets have too much power left there to be fooling around with them,” Mr. Lepage said.
  • County Herald headline Friday May 3, 1957, “High School Board Pares Budget Holds Rate Increase to .98 Mills”. In what has been termed a “cut-to-the-bone” budget, Midland – Penetanguishene District High School Board this year is asking the six municipalities it serves to raise $164,595.31 on a 9.97 mill rate based on a total equalized assessment of $16,526,654. The 1957 high school levy is .98 mills higher than the 1956 rate of 8.99 mills for a net budget of $144,701.34. Midland taxpayers’ share of the 1957 budget will be 50.25 per cent or $82,709.17. On the basis of $7,000 per mill, the Midland tax rate for high school purposes will be approximately 12 mills.
  • R. J. Pinchin was re-elected president of the board of directors of St. Andrew’s Hospital, at the inaugural meeting of elected board members in Midland YMCA April 26. Other board officers for the ensuing year are John D. Doughty, vice-president; Miss E. Violet Edwards, treasurer; A. E. Davidson, secretary. Standing committees are as follows: management, J. D. Doughty, chairman. Miss E. V. Edwards; finance, Gordon Moss, chairman, Frank Spence; public relations, Mrs. W. L. Attridge, chairman, R. A. Megaw; property John Burke, chairman, S. F. Malin.
  • Penetang’s Town Planning Board became a reality Monday night with the approval of a bylaw appointing six men to the board. On the board are: Deputy reeve Archie Verrière and Chas. Thompson, one year; Art McKee and O. Ross, two years; C. S. Wice and George Bryant, three years.
  • TOWN OF PENETANGUISHENE NOTICE re Dogs TAKE NOTICE that Mr. Earl Vivian has been appointed as Dog License Issuer for 1957. Time for purchase of licenses has been extended to May 15th, 1957, after which date all persons not obtaining licenses may be prosecuted. Mr. Vivian will attend at Council Chambers on Tuesday and Friday until May 15th, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. to issue licenses, TAKE NOTICE further that dogs are prohibited from running at large during months of May, June, July, August- and September, and provisions of By-law No. 1202 will be strictly enforced. By Order, Town Council, W. H. HEWSON, Clerk-Treasurer.
  • Don Argue, who for the past 12 years served in the parts department at Boyd’s Service station, Midland, has now joined the sales staff of Bourgeois Motors Limited. Don, who was born in Midland and educated in the town’s public and high schools, is emulating somewhat the footsteps of Lionel Bourgeois, head of Bourgeois Motors. Mr. Bourgeois formerly worked at Boyd’s. Mr. Argue, who has been in the garage business for the past 16 years, started with Boyd’s when they operated a service station on Hugel Ave., transferred to the Shell Oil Co. at Barrie for a year and then returned to Midland. He rejoined Boyd’s staff at the King and Yonge Streets gas station and remained there until transferring to Bourgeois last week.
  • Construction work on six modern cottages is under way in Little Lake Park, Midland. Floor of one had been completed yesterday. New cottages, total cost of which will be in the neighborhood of $12,000, are to be erected in the extreme westerly section of the park, near three cottages which were built last year. They are to be completed early in June. Contract for the buildings was awarded to Nap Beauchamp Construction of Penetang ($9,300). Electrical work is being done by Walker’s Electric ($580), and plumbing by Norman Reynolds ($2,773).
  • Seriously hurt in an automobile accident last week, the condition of Joseph Leeking, well known in Midland, has shown some improvement recently, according to his physician, Dr. James Small. Mr. Leeking suffered severe chest injuries and a broken hip when the car he was driving was struck by another vehicle on Vindin Street, near the northwest boundary of Midland. Mr. Leeking has been a patient in St. Andrews Hospital since the crash.
  • One hundred and thirty-two properties, 25 of them in North Simcoe municipalities, will be sold by public auction at a treasurer’s sale of lands in Barrie July 9. The lands are being sold to discharge tax arrears against them. In quantity. Port McNicoll heads the list with 16 lots and parts of lots to be placed on the auction block. One of the lots has, in tax arrears and accrued costs, $148.82 against it.
  • TEN YEARS AGO THIS WEEK: Finance Minister Douglas Abbott announced that, effective July 1, income taxes for those in the lower income brackets would be halved. Average cut in personal income taxes was 29 per cent. * **Forty-five persons  representing churches in Midland and district attended a recreation leadership course at Midland High School. *** Gordon Boyd, Doug Haig, Win Smith and Jack Doughty had organized trout fishing parties. The groups planned to do their angling in the Huntsville and Algonquin Park areas. * * * A memorial window, honoring two pioneer Penetang doctors, was unveiled in All Saints Church, Penetang. Doctors honored were Dr. George Bowman and Dr. F. H. Spohn. * * * George S. Dudley, Q.C, Midland, had been appointed secretary-manager of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. * * * Coldwater businessmen were making plans to organize a Board of Trade in the village. A committee had been named to interview village merchants and obtain their views on the proposal.
  • Margaret Rose Taylor of  Waubaushene become the only girl in a class of 49 male engineering students at McMaster University in Hamilton. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Taylor, her interests ran to maths and science when she attended Midland District High School. But she didn’t want to become a teacher of those subjects, and eventually settled on engineering.
  • A resident of Midland for the past 52 years John Sharp died April 29 at St. Andrews Hospital. John Sharp was born at Muir Kirk Scotland, April 20, 1879, and was educated there. He came to Canada when he was 24 years of age and came to Midland in 1905 and worked at the flour mill and then at the shipyard until it closed down a few years ago. In December, 1909, he married Sarah Jane Gilbank in Midland where he had resided for the  past 48 years. A member of the Gospel Hall, Mr. Sharp liked to read, until his eyesight began to fail a few years ago. Predeceased by his wife, Feb, 1, 1955, he is survived by four children. Nelson of Burlington, Mrs. Leahan (Annie) of Long Branch, Stella at home and Bert of Midland. Also surviving are two sisters, one living in Montreal and the other in London.
  • H. J. Thompson and Sons, Midland, this week acquired one new staff member and promoted another. Promoted was James Downer who started with the firm in the fall of 1945, following his discharge from the RCAF. He has been named shop foreman. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Downer, Jim was born in Tiny Township, receiving his education there and at Midland High School. Following his graduation Jim spent five years sailing on Great Lakes ships, joining the RCAF in 1941. The 41-year-old foreman completed a tour of operations overseas with 424 RCAF Bomber Squadron, serving as an observer. Following his tour, he served a year and a half as an instructor and returned to Canada in August, 1945. Commissioned in 1943, he was a flying officer when he was discharged. He started with H. J. Thompson and Sons in September, 1945, as a plumber’s apprentice. Married to the former Evelyn Denis of Midland, they have two children, Noreen, 14, and James, 4. Jim is a past president of Midland branch, Canadian Legion, a member of the YMCA Foreman’s Club and an officer in the Grey and Simcoe Foresters reserve  army unit. Joining Thompson’s sales staff is 28-year-old Ernie Booth, a native of Toronto where he attended public and high schools. Previous to joining Thompson’s staff, he had managed an appliance store in Midland. He is married to the former Joan Parker of Tay Township. They have three children. After graduation from high school, Ernie served in the Royal Canadian Navy Reserve for three years. He was stationed in Bermuda, Toronto and Halifax from 1948 to 1951. He is a member of the Canadian Legion.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mosley of Midland announce the engagement of their daughter, Beverly Anne, to Mr. Boyd Watson Leonard of Wyebridge, the marriage to take place on Saturday, May 25, 1957, at Knox Presbyterian Church, Midland.
  • Mr. and Mrs. John Cameron, Midland, wish to announce the birth of their son, David Lawrence, on Wednesday, April 24, 1957, at St. Andrews Hospital, a brother for Douglas.
  • Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – April 24th to 30th, 1957

    Click on Photos to EnlargeNew eye-catching sign has just been erected at the western outskirts of Midland on Yonge Street at Seventh. Chamber of Commerce Secretary-Manager R. B. Moffatt, Publicity Chairman Al Perkins and President Frank Bray examine the sign. The Midland Horticultural Society plans to landscape the bank in front of it. 

    Some youngster, or youngsters, in this area, will get financial assistance for a holiday at Kitchikewana YMCA Camp this summer, through the efforts of the Adelphi Hi-Y Club of Midland YMCA. Several club members toured Midland homes Wednesday in quest of baskets, bottles and coat hangers, proceeds from the sale of which will be used to send a lad to camp. Sorting out the pile of bottles and coat hangers are Bev Day, left, and Wayne Morrisson. 

    Stacking up the big pile of baskets in this photo are Marty Reynolds, left, and Len Wood. 

    In the service station business in Midland for the past 20 years, Frank Wilford, left, sold his business last week to Henry Laurin. Mr. Laurin also operates the Midland – Penetang ambulance service. After a few weeks holidays, Mr. Wilford expects to enter a new field of business in Midland. 

    Well-known to patrons of Penetang and Midland hotel dining rooms, where she served for many years, Mrs. Garnet Hanes has taken over the operation of the former Wilford snack bar on Midland’s King Street. Mrs. Hanes is seen above admiring some of the flowers sent by well-wishers when she started her new business venture this week. 

    Can they repeat again this year? That question will be answered in Collingwood today and tomorrow as these youngsters battle to retain the provincial championship they won in the LHL Junior OHA series at Parry Sound last spring. Kneeling; Bobby Clayton, Earl Scott, Tom Gray, Doug French. Second row; Greg Somers, Jim Tippin, Allan Mostyn, Jon Pettersen, Chester Graham, Bob Weckman, Keith Bath. Back row; Bill Brooks, Wayne Holden, John Swan, Don Pringle, Dave Brooks, Doug Taylor, Dennis Abbott, Randy Small, Rev. Len Self. 

    Residents of Port McNicoll for 45 years, Mr. & Mrs. Alphonse Maheu are seen cutting their golden anniversary cake at a reception held for them at the Bourgeois dining room on Tuesday. Both born in Perkinsfield they have also lived in Depot Harbour and Penetang before settling in Port. (A detailed article accompanied the photo) 

    Joseph Leeking of Midland is in the hospital with serious chest injuries after the car he was driving was in collision with a car driven by Melvin Ritchie of Elmvale. The accident occurred Tuesday afternoon on Vinden Road. Also involved were Mrs. Melvin Ritchie and James Hawke who was riding in the Leeking car. Mr. Ritchie is seen surveying the damage to the front of his car. 

     Ten years of “friendly business relationship and outstanding service to the motoring public” by Doug Swann, veteran Midland garage man, has been recognized officially by the Shell Oil Co. of Canada Ltd. In addition to this handsome plaque, Mr. Swann also received a gold pin. 

    “IN THE DOUGH,” as a baker that is, for 57 of his 71 years, Norman Dunn can recall the days when Hillsdale was one of the most important centres in North Simcoe. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn marked their golden wedding anniversary April 10, in the home in which they have lived for 37 years.

    Article by Ken Somers

    Remember when Hillsdale was served by a railway? There aren’t too many people living who were around when the rail service was discontinued. Among them are Mr. and Mrs. Norman Dunn who, on April 10, marked their golden wedding anniversary. Both are well qualified to talk about the early days of Hillsdale. Mr. Dunn was born there, 71 years ago, and his wife came to the then thriving village when she was 12 years old. “It was a much busier place than it is now,” said Mr. Dunn, recalling three saw mills, three shingle mills, a hoop and stave factory and a planing mill which provided employment for a population of around six or seven hundred persons. Things were much livelier then in the business section too, with two hotels, the same number of bake shops and blacksmith shops, and half a dozen stores. Then, as now, there were three churches. There was also a public school, the same one, incidentally, that some of the Dunn’s grandchildren attend even today. “Grandma and grandpa” attended that school together, and it was there they first met.  Norman Dunn didn’t have too long a period to attend school. At the age of 14 he became an apprentice in the bakeshop of the late Louis Roberts. He received, at most, $4 per week. “I had to pay my keep out of that, too,” said Mr. Dunn. He agreed Mr. Roberts couldn’t afford to pay much more, with bread selling at six cents per loaf. Flour, of course, cost only half the price it does today. In any event, Mr. Dunn stuck with the job and is still at it, some 57 years later. He has a small oven right in his home, across the road from Rumble’s Pond, at the easterly edge of  the village.  Although he was a pastry man, too, in his younger days, now he bakes bread only, which he peddles in his car throughout the Medonte side roads.  After their marriage in the parsonage of the old Methodist Church in Penetang April 10, 1907, the Dunn’s lived in a number of places before returning to the village some 37 years ago. Mrs. Dunn, the former Margaret Drennan, was born on a farm near Cookstown, one of four girls and four boys born to the late Mr. and Mrs. James Drennan. Her father built bridges and did other construction work throughout the area, as well as operate a farm. Of the eight children, all the girls are still living and two of the sons, Fred and Norman, both of Toronto. In addition to Mrs. Dunn, the daughters are Mrs. Fred Grigg, Elmvale; Mrs. Tom Fagan, Crossland; and Mrs. William Parker, of R.R. 3, Midland. In her younger days Mrs. Dunn sang in the Presbyterian Church choir with one of her sisters, Mrs. Grigg. She was also an early member of Hillsdale W.I. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn have four children of their own, including three sons, Grant, Hillsdale, Harold, Toronto, and Fred of Barrie; and one daughter, Mrs. George Lockhart (Gladys), who  also lives in Hillsdale. There are eight grandchildren. Norman Dunn was also born on a farm, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Dunn. A brother, George, still resides in Hillsdale, but their only sister died some years ago. [Normand died in 1959 and Margaret in 1971, they are both buried in Hillsdale] 

     Where’s my prize mister? A study in expression at the Midland Arena Saturday as children line up to exchange their tokens, dropped from an airplane, for candy during the annual Y’s Men’s Club Easter egg hunt. [Most of my favourite photos in the Free Press collection are of children, this unknown little girl is another. I don’t believe it is about the candy, it is that strange man with the huge camera pointed right at her.]

    Queen of Hearts Marita Lalonde of Penetang receives train tickets and hotel reservations for herself and a chaperone prior to their departure for Montreal Friday. The queen’s trip was jointly sponsored by the Free Press and the Roxy Theatre. Managing editor Wils Harrison on the left and theatre manage Al Perkins. 

    Red, white and blue is the colour scheme of children’s playground equipment at Midland Drive-in Theatre this year. Two painters are shown putting finishing touches to swings in the background, while two little girls amuse themselves in the sandbox centre foreground. The drive-in, which opened on the weekend, was undergoing general spring face lifting operations when this photo was taken.

    New picture of Queen Elizabeth to replace the one destroyed by fire last fall, was donated to St. Mary’s Separate School by Dominion Stores Limited last Monday. The picture presented by Ross Hart, manager of the Midland store, was accepted by Sister Frances Matthew, the principal. Other staff members in the picture are Mrs. N. Butineau, Sister Mary Imelda, Mrs. N. Tremblay and Miss Margaret Ambeau. 

     

    Still compelling arguments in 2017! 

    • Midland Free Press, Wednesday, April 24, 1957, headline; New Provincial Education Grants for Six Municipalities Top $9,000. Six North Simcoe municipalities will receive more than $9,000 in new education grants for elementary schools. The new grants were announced by provincial government officials last week. They amount to $3 per pupil based on the 1956 average daily attendance.
    • County Herald, Friday, April 26, 1957, headline; Epidemic of Break-ins Launches Probe by OPP. Numerous reports of cottage break-ins all over the Tiny, Tay and Medonte Township areas which they patrol have kept provincial police at Victoria Harbour exceptionally busy. In addition to the cottage break-ins, there have also been numerous reports of thefts of tires, batteries, boats and other articles, police said.
    • Immediately following the Easter recess, Simcoe County Health Unit will start to vaccinate more than 8,000 elementary school children throughout the county. According to the program released by director Dr. P. A. Scott, children who received two doses of Salk polio vaccine in 1955 and did not receive the third dose in 1956, will receive a third dose this year.
    • Members of lOOF, No. 274 Midland, hope to start construction on a new Odd Fellows Temple around mid-June. Measuring about 40 by 80 feet, the building will be erected on a newly-purchased lot on Dominion Ave. West, between King and First Streets. For many years the Odd Fellows have used the third floor of the Jeffery Block as their lodge room. Noble Grand Ernie Bates, who is also serving as chairman of the building committee, said the new hall would have two storeys but no basement. A banquet hall will occupy the first floor. In addition to the lodge room on the second floor, there will also be a board room, capable of seating around 20-25 persons and which will be made available to the public on a rental basis.
    • Entering its 21st year of selling automobiles, Gropp Motors Ltd. recently announced the appointment of Lloyd LaPlume to the sales staff, and promotion of Ken Tannahill to sales manager. “Lefty” St. Amant is the third salesman. Gropp’s sales staff has two men who know the automotive business from the ground up, having worked their way up from the maintenance shop. The two, Ken Tannahill and “Lefty” St. Amant have a combined total of 21 years in the business.
    • Lack of bread in Penetang grocery stores Saturday afternoon was one item of evidence pointing to the heavy influx of cottagers into the area for the Easter weekend. Before 5 o’clock Saturday it was virtually impossible to buy bread in grocery stores throughout the town.
    • Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Johnson announce the engagement of their daughter Kathryn Alfreda to Mr. Gerald Clair Lalonde, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eudger Lalonde of Penetanguishene, the marriage to take place May 11, 1957, in St. Margaret’s Church, Midland, at 9 a.m.
    • CLARK — Jim and Edythe Clark are pleased to announce the birth of their first son, James Frederick, April 21st, at St. Andrews Hospital, Midland.
    • SWEETING—Tommy Sweeting, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Sweeting, is happy to announce the arrival of a baby brother Timothy, April 22nd, at St Andrews Hospital, Midland.
    • 25 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK –  Newly-organized Medical Association for Midland and district held its first meeting in St. Andrews Hospital. Doctors and nurses from Midland, Penetang, Victoria Harbour and Port McNicoll attended. * * * Tay Township council approved a motion calling for 24-hour service, seven days a week, on the Tay Telephone System. *** Midland council informed ratepayers that a 10 per cent penalty would be added to all tax arrears, effective May 1. * * * A bakery in Waubaushene, operated by Phillip Thiffault, and two houses adjoining it were totally destroyed by a fire which threatened to spread to other sections of the village. Midland fire brigade was called in to assist the village bucket brigade. *** Houses on Eighth Street, Midland, were threatened by a bush fire which broke out near the Penetang – Waverley highway (Hwy 27). The flames, which were moving along a half-mile front, came within 20 yards of one home before the fire was extinguished by Midland firemen. * * * After a 56-hour battle with windrow ice in Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior, the CPR steamer Keewatin of Port McNicoll docked at Fort William. The Keewatin was the first vessel into the port that year. Her skipper was Capt. Davidson.
    • Obit – Funeral services for Mrs. Leger Marchand were held April 5 from the Beausoleil funeral home, Penetang, to St. Ann’s Memorial Church where Father J . Marchand officiated. Interment was in St. Ann’s Cemetery. Pallbearers, were Clifford, Gerald and George Bellisle, George Lavery and Marcel and Wilfrid Marchand. Born in Lafontaine, Mrs. Marchand was in her 71st year at the time of her death, April 2. She spent her early life in Lafontaine where she went to school and later married Leger Marchand Sept. 31, 1905. Following their marriage, the couple lived in Kitchener for eight years, 20 years in Midland, and the remainder in Penetang.  A Roman Catholic, Mrs. Marchand, besides her church activities, was very fond of horticulture and sewing. Surviving besides her husband are eight daughters, Matilda Bellisle, Irene Lavery, Della Monk, Helen McGaw, Alice Wilson, Bertha Monk, Rose Steffers and Laura Marchand; and four sons, Arthur, Wilfrid, Marcel and Jack. There are 30 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren.
    • Obit –  John Fralick conducted the funeral service for Mrs. Samuel Ellery who died March 28 at Wyebridge. Service was held at the Church of Good Shepherd, Wyebridge. Interment was in the adjoining cemetery. Mrs. Ellery, the former Mary Celesta Edwards, was born January 26, 1876, at Wyebridge and was educated there. In July 1895, she married Samuel J. Ellery at Wyebridge where she had lived all her life. An Anglican, Mrs. Ellery was an active member of the Ladies’ Guild, and was also a member of the Women’s Institute for many years. Besides her husband she is survived by sons, Cecil of Wyebridge, Calvin of Elmvale; daughter, Mrs. Cecil Townes (Mildred) of Wyebridge; and a sister Mrs. David Douglas of Wyebridge.
    • Obit –  J. McDonagh conducted the funeral service for Mrs. Georgina Arbour, widow of the late Merrille Arbour, April 15 at St. John’s Roman Catholic Church, Waubaushene. Interment was made in St. John’s Cemetery. Pallbearers were sons Dorman Arbour, William Arbour, Gilbert Arbour, Bud Arbour, and grandsons Bernard and Raymond Rivers. Born in Waubaushene July 6, 1881, Mrs. Arbour, the former Georgina Bazinet, was educated and lived there all her life. Surviving are six sons, Orval, Waubaushene, Dorman of Port Colborne, William of Hamilton, Gilbert of Niagara Falls, Lenard of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Bud of Orillia; five daughters, Mrs. Ted Rivers (Pamela) of Toronto, Mrs. Ernest Bourdeau (Alda) of Tecumseh, Mrs. Art Sampson (Alma) of Toronto, Mrs. Barney Johnson (Cecilia) of Midland and Mrs. Arnold Pullen (Doris) of Toronto. Also, surviving is one sister, Mrs. Fred St. Amand of Penetang. There are 39  grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. Mrs. Arbour’s husband predeceased her in January 1957.
    • Obit –  Miss Annie Burton died in Penetang General Hospital April 8 after several months’ illness. The funeral was held April 10 in Elmvale Presbyterian Church with Rev. J . C. Cooper conducting the service. Pallbearers were W. J. Hill, W. S. Campbell, Dr. D. C. Harvie, A. G. Beardsall, C. L. Copeland and S. L. Anderson. Interment was in Elmvale Cemetery.  Annie Burton was born in Elmvale Feb. 7, 1887, the daughter of the late Charles Stephen Burton and Annie Paterson. She spent all her life in Elmvale with the exception of two years at Collingwood Collegiate. Miss Burton worked in the Bank of Toronto during the first World War. Later she entered her father’s office and succeeded him as clerk-treasurer of the village, a post she held for 26 years. In addition, she carried on her father’s business of insurance and conveyancing, keeping the office in the Burton name for almost 70 years. She was a notary public. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. W. W. Shaw (Jean), Mrs. F. A. Stephenson (Alice), both of Elmvale. A brother, Robert P. Burton, predeceased her.
    • Want Ad –  AN INTERESTING position for a teacher at S.S. No. 15 Tay, on Highway 12 between Midland and Orillia. Duties to commence in September. Minimum salary of $2400 with $200 annual increments. Apply, stating qualifications, to Mrs. Cora Connor, Sec.-Treas., R.R. 1, Waubaushene, Ontario.
    • Want Ad –  HIGH SCHOOL Boy, 17-18, to work Saturday mornings till school closes, full time during summer, in Penetang store. Reply to Box 562, Free Press Herald, Midland.
    • Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – April 24th to 30th, 1957

      Click on Photos to EnlargeNew eye-catching sign has just been erected at the western outskirts of Midland on Yonge Street at Seventh. Chamber of Commerce Secretary-Manager R. B. Moffatt, Publicity Chairman Al Perkins and President Frank Bray examine the sign. The Midland Horticultural Society plans to landscape the bank in front of it. 

      Some youngster, or youngsters, in this area, will get financial assistance for a holiday at Kitchikewana YMCA Camp this summer, through the efforts of the Adelphi Hi-Y Club of Midland YMCA. Several club members toured Midland homes Wednesday in quest of baskets, bottles and coat hangers, proceeds from the sale of which will be used to send a lad to camp. Sorting out the pile of bottles and coat hangers are Bev Day, left, and Wayne Morrisson. 

      Stacking up the big pile of baskets in this photo are Marty Reynolds, left, and Len Wood. 

      In the service station business in Midland for the past 20 years, Frank Wilford, left, sold his business last week to Henry Laurin. Mr. Laurin also operates the Midland – Penetang ambulance service. After a few weeks holidays, Mr. Wilford expects to enter a new field of business in Midland. 

      Well-known to patrons of Penetang and Midland hotel dining rooms, where she served for many years, Mrs. Garnet Hanes has taken over the operation of the former Wilford snack bar on Midland’s King Street. Mrs. Hanes is seen above admiring some of the flowers sent by well-wishers when she started her new business venture this week. 

      Can they repeat again this year? That question will be answered in Collingwood today and tomorrow as these youngsters battle to retain the provincial championship they won in the LHL Junior OHA series at Parry Sound last spring. Kneeling; Bobby Clayton, Earl Scott, Tom Gray, Doug French. Second row; Greg Somers, Jim Tippin, Allan Mostyn, Jon Pettersen, Chester Graham, Bob Weckman, Keith Bath. Back row; Bill Brooks, Wayne Holden, John Swan, Don Pringle, Dave Brooks, Doug Taylor, Dennis Abbott, Randy Small, Rev. Len Self. 

      Residents of Port McNicoll for 45 years, Mr. & Mrs. Alphonse Maheu are seen cutting their golden anniversary cake at a reception held for them at the Bourgeois dining room on Tuesday. Both born in Perkinsfield they have also lived in Depot Harbour and Penetang before settling in Port. (A detailed article accompanied the photo) 

      Joseph Leeking of Midland is in the hospital with serious chest injuries after the car he was driving was in collision with a car driven by Melvin Ritchie of Elmvale. The accident occurred Tuesday afternoon on Vinden Road. Also involved were Mrs. Melvin Ritchie and James Hawke who was riding in the Leeking car. Mr. Ritchie is seen surveying the damage to the front of his car. 

       Ten years of “friendly business relationship and outstanding service to the motoring public” by Doug Swann, veteran Midland garage man, has been recognized officially by the Shell Oil Co. of Canada Ltd. In addition to this handsome plaque, Mr. Swann also received a gold pin. 

      “IN THE DOUGH,” as a baker that is, for 57 of his 71 years, Norman Dunn can recall the days when Hillsdale was one of the most important centres in North Simcoe. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn marked their golden wedding anniversary April 10, in the home in which they have lived for 37 years.

      Article by Ken Somers

      Remember when Hillsdale was served by a railway? There aren’t too many people living who were around when the rail service was discontinued. Among them are Mr. and Mrs. Norman Dunn who, on April 10, marked their golden wedding anniversary. Both are well qualified to talk about the early days of Hillsdale. Mr. Dunn was born there, 71 years ago, and his wife came to the then thriving village when she was 12 years old. “It was a much busier place than it is now,” said Mr. Dunn, recalling three saw mills, three shingle mills, a hoop and stave factory and a planing mill which provided employment for a population of around six or seven hundred persons. Things were much livelier then in the business section too, with two hotels, the same number of bake shops and blacksmith shops, and half a dozen stores. Then, as now, there were three churches. There was also a public school, the same one, incidentally, that some of the Dunn’s grandchildren attend even today. “Grandma and grandpa” attended that school together, and it was there they first met.  Norman Dunn didn’t have too long a period to attend school. At the age of 14 he became an apprentice in the bakeshop of the late Louis Roberts. He received, at most, $4 per week. “I had to pay my keep out of that, too,” said Mr. Dunn. He agreed Mr. Roberts couldn’t afford to pay much more, with bread selling at six cents per loaf. Flour, of course, cost only half the price it does today. In any event, Mr. Dunn stuck with the job and is still at it, some 57 years later. He has a small oven right in his home, across the road from Rumble’s Pond, at the easterly edge of  the village.  Although he was a pastry man, too, in his younger days, now he bakes bread only, which he peddles in his car throughout the Medonte side roads.  After their marriage in the parsonage of the old Methodist Church in Penetang April 10, 1907, the Dunn’s lived in a number of places before returning to the village some 37 years ago. Mrs. Dunn, the former Margaret Drennan, was born on a farm near Cookstown, one of four girls and four boys born to the late Mr. and Mrs. James Drennan. Her father built bridges and did other construction work throughout the area, as well as operate a farm. Of the eight children, all the girls are still living and two of the sons, Fred and Norman, both of Toronto. In addition to Mrs. Dunn, the daughters are Mrs. Fred Grigg, Elmvale; Mrs. Tom Fagan, Crossland; and Mrs. William Parker, of R.R. 3, Midland. In her younger days Mrs. Dunn sang in the Presbyterian Church choir with one of her sisters, Mrs. Grigg. She was also an early member of Hillsdale W.I. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn have four children of their own, including three sons, Grant, Hillsdale, Harold, Toronto, and Fred of Barrie; and one daughter, Mrs. George Lockhart (Gladys), who  also lives in Hillsdale. There are eight grandchildren. Norman Dunn was also born on a farm, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Dunn. A brother, George, still resides in Hillsdale, but their only sister died some years ago. [Normand died in 1959 and Margaret in 1971, they are both buried in Hillsdale] 

       Where’s my prize mister? A study in expression at the Midland Arena Saturday as children line up to exchange their tokens, dropped from an airplane, for candy during the annual Y’s Men’s Club Easter egg hunt. [Most of my favourite photos in the Free Press collection are of children, this unknown little girl is another. I don’t believe it is about the candy, it is that strange man with the huge camera pointed right at her.]

      Queen of Hearts Marita Lalonde of Penetang receives train tickets and hotel reservations for herself and a chaperone prior to their departure for Montreal Friday. The queen’s trip was jointly sponsored by the Free Press and the Roxy Theatre. Managing editor Wils Harrison on the left and theatre manage Al Perkins. 

      Red, white and blue is the colour scheme of children’s playground equipment at Midland Drive-in Theatre this year. Two painters are shown putting finishing touches to swings in the background, while two little girls amuse themselves in the sandbox centre foreground. The drive-in, which opened on the weekend, was undergoing general spring face lifting operations when this photo was taken.

      New picture of Queen Elizabeth to replace the one destroyed by fire last fall, was donated to St. Mary’s Separate School by Dominion Stores Limited last Monday. The picture presented by Ross Hart, manager of the Midland store, was accepted by Sister Frances Matthew, the principal. Other staff members in the picture are Mrs. N. Butineau, Sister Mary Imelda, Mrs. N. Tremblay and Miss Margaret Ambeau. 

       

      Still compelling arguments in 2017! 

      • Midland Free Press, Wednesday, April 24, 1957, headline; New Provincial Education Grants for Six Municipalities Top $9,000. Six North Simcoe municipalities will receive more than $9,000 in new education grants for elementary schools. The new grants were announced by provincial government officials last week. They amount to $3 per pupil based on the 1956 average daily attendance.
      • County Herald, Friday, April 26, 1957, headline; Epidemic of Break-ins Launches Probe by OPP. Numerous reports of cottage break-ins all over the Tiny, Tay and Medonte Township areas which they patrol have kept provincial police at Victoria Harbour exceptionally busy. In addition to the cottage break-ins, there have also been numerous reports of thefts of tires, batteries, boats and other articles, police said.
      • Immediately following the Easter recess, Simcoe County Health Unit will start to vaccinate more than 8,000 elementary school children throughout the county. According to the program released by director Dr. P. A. Scott, children who received two doses of Salk polio vaccine in 1955 and did not receive the third dose in 1956, will receive a third dose this year.
      • Members of lOOF, No. 274 Midland, hope to start construction on a new Odd Fellows Temple around mid-June. Measuring about 40 by 80 feet, the building will be erected on a newly-purchased lot on Dominion Ave. West, between King and First Streets. For many years the Odd Fellows have used the third floor of the Jeffery Block as their lodge room. Noble Grand Ernie Bates, who is also serving as chairman of the building committee, said the new hall would have two storeys but no basement. A banquet hall will occupy the first floor. In addition to the lodge room on the second floor, there will also be a board room, capable of seating around 20-25 persons and which will be made available to the public on a rental basis.
      • Entering its 21st year of selling automobiles, Gropp Motors Ltd. recently announced the appointment of Lloyd LaPlume to the sales staff, and promotion of Ken Tannahill to sales manager. “Lefty” St. Amant is the third salesman. Gropp’s sales staff has two men who know the automotive business from the ground up, having worked their way up from the maintenance shop. The two, Ken Tannahill and “Lefty” St. Amant have a combined total of 21 years in the business.
      • Lack of bread in Penetang grocery stores Saturday afternoon was one item of evidence pointing to the heavy influx of cottagers into the area for the Easter weekend. Before 5 o’clock Saturday it was virtually impossible to buy bread in grocery stores throughout the town.
      • Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Johnson announce the engagement of their daughter Kathryn Alfreda to Mr. Gerald Clair Lalonde, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eudger Lalonde of Penetanguishene, the marriage to take place May 11, 1957, in St. Margaret’s Church, Midland, at 9 a.m.
      • CLARK — Jim and Edythe Clark are pleased to announce the birth of their first son, James Frederick, April 21st, at St. Andrews Hospital, Midland.
      • SWEETING—Tommy Sweeting, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Sweeting, is happy to announce the arrival of a baby brother Timothy, April 22nd, at St Andrews Hospital, Midland.
      • 25 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK –  Newly-organized Medical Association for Midland and district held its first meeting in St. Andrews Hospital. Doctors and nurses from Midland, Penetang, Victoria Harbour and Port McNicoll attended. * * * Tay Township council approved a motion calling for 24-hour service, seven days a week, on the Tay Telephone System. *** Midland council informed ratepayers that a 10 per cent penalty would be added to all tax arrears, effective May 1. * * * A bakery in Waubaushene, operated by Phillip Thiffault, and two houses adjoining it were totally destroyed by a fire which threatened to spread to other sections of the village. Midland fire brigade was called in to assist the village bucket brigade. *** Houses on Eighth Street, Midland, were threatened by a bush fire which broke out near the Penetang – Waverley highway (Hwy 27). The flames, which were moving along a half-mile front, came within 20 yards of one home before the fire was extinguished by Midland firemen. * * * After a 56-hour battle with windrow ice in Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior, the CPR steamer Keewatin of Port McNicoll docked at Fort William. The Keewatin was the first vessel into the port that year. Her skipper was Capt. Davidson.
      • Obit – Funeral services for Mrs. Leger Marchand were held April 5 from the Beausoleil funeral home, Penetang, to St. Ann’s Memorial Church where Father J . Marchand officiated. Interment was in St. Ann’s Cemetery. Pallbearers, were Clifford, Gerald and George Bellisle, George Lavery and Marcel and Wilfrid Marchand. Born in Lafontaine, Mrs. Marchand was in her 71st year at the time of her death, April 2. She spent her early life in Lafontaine where she went to school and later married Leger Marchand Sept. 31, 1905. Following their marriage, the couple lived in Kitchener for eight years, 20 years in Midland, and the remainder in Penetang.  A Roman Catholic, Mrs. Marchand, besides her church activities, was very fond of horticulture and sewing. Surviving besides her husband are eight daughters, Matilda Bellisle, Irene Lavery, Della Monk, Helen McGaw, Alice Wilson, Bertha Monk, Rose Steffers and Laura Marchand; and four sons, Arthur, Wilfrid, Marcel and Jack. There are 30 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren.
      • Obit –  John Fralick conducted the funeral service for Mrs. Samuel Ellery who died March 28 at Wyebridge. Service was held at the Church of Good Shepherd, Wyebridge. Interment was in the adjoining cemetery. Mrs. Ellery, the former Mary Celesta Edwards, was born January 26, 1876, at Wyebridge and was educated there. In July 1895, she married Samuel J. Ellery at Wyebridge where she had lived all her life. An Anglican, Mrs. Ellery was an active member of the Ladies’ Guild, and was also a member of the Women’s Institute for many years. Besides her husband she is survived by sons, Cecil of Wyebridge, Calvin of Elmvale; daughter, Mrs. Cecil Townes (Mildred) of Wyebridge; and a sister Mrs. David Douglas of Wyebridge.
      • Obit –  J. McDonagh conducted the funeral service for Mrs. Georgina Arbour, widow of the late Merrille Arbour, April 15 at St. John’s Roman Catholic Church, Waubaushene. Interment was made in St. John’s Cemetery. Pallbearers were sons Dorman Arbour, William Arbour, Gilbert Arbour, Bud Arbour, and grandsons Bernard and Raymond Rivers. Born in Waubaushene July 6, 1881, Mrs. Arbour, the former Georgina Bazinet, was educated and lived there all her life. Surviving are six sons, Orval, Waubaushene, Dorman of Port Colborne, William of Hamilton, Gilbert of Niagara Falls, Lenard of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Bud of Orillia; five daughters, Mrs. Ted Rivers (Pamela) of Toronto, Mrs. Ernest Bourdeau (Alda) of Tecumseh, Mrs. Art Sampson (Alma) of Toronto, Mrs. Barney Johnson (Cecilia) of Midland and Mrs. Arnold Pullen (Doris) of Toronto. Also, surviving is one sister, Mrs. Fred St. Amand of Penetang. There are 39  grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. Mrs. Arbour’s husband predeceased her in January 1957.
      • Obit –  Miss Annie Burton died in Penetang General Hospital April 8 after several months’ illness. The funeral was held April 10 in Elmvale Presbyterian Church with Rev. J . C. Cooper conducting the service. Pallbearers were W. J. Hill, W. S. Campbell, Dr. D. C. Harvie, A. G. Beardsall, C. L. Copeland and S. L. Anderson. Interment was in Elmvale Cemetery.  Annie Burton was born in Elmvale Feb. 7, 1887, the daughter of the late Charles Stephen Burton and Annie Paterson. She spent all her life in Elmvale with the exception of two years at Collingwood Collegiate. Miss Burton worked in the Bank of Toronto during the first World War. Later she entered her father’s office and succeeded him as clerk-treasurer of the village, a post she held for 26 years. In addition, she carried on her father’s business of insurance and conveyancing, keeping the office in the Burton name for almost 70 years. She was a notary public. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. W. W. Shaw (Jean), Mrs. F. A. Stephenson (Alice), both of Elmvale. A brother, Robert P. Burton, predeceased her.
      • Want Ad –  AN INTERESTING position for a teacher at S.S. No. 15 Tay, on Highway 12 between Midland and Orillia. Duties to commence in September. Minimum salary of $2400 with $200 annual increments. Apply, stating qualifications, to Mrs. Cora Connor, Sec.-Treas., R.R. 1, Waubaushene, Ontario.
      • Want Ad –  HIGH SCHOOL Boy, 17-18, to work Saturday mornings till school closes, full time during summer, in Penetang store. Reply to Box 562, Free Press Herald, Midland.

      Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – April 16th to 23rd 1957

      Click on Photos to EnlargeAlmut Bezner of Midland is feeding a sardine h’odoeuvre to Lieut. George Wakeford of Owen Sound at a dance held at the Midland Armoury by the Grey and Simcoe Foresters Saturday night. Public relations officer for the regiment Lieut. Wakeford and other officers from Owen Sound are growing beards for a centenary to be held in that city. 

       Mayors of Midland and Penetang were among the guests of the Grey and Simcoe Foresters at a regimental dinner and dance at the Midland Armory Saturday night. Mayor A. B. Thompson, Penetang; Major and Mrs. D. W. Syer, Owen Sound; Col. And Mrs. D. B. McKee, Owen Sound; Mayor Charles Parker, Midland. In the rear, Capt. J. S. Corcoran, Midland and Major Jack Symons, Penetang. 

       In Midland over the weekend for their annual conference, officers of the Grey and Simcoe Foresters Regiment are seen in this group picture taken beside the armory. Some of the “top brass” are seen seated in the front row; Lieut. George A. Wakeford, Owen Sound; Capt. Dave Witiw, Dundas; Capt. J. S. Corcoran, Midland; Lieut-Col. D. Fearman, Dundas; Col. G. A. Henderson, 17 Militia Group Commander, Hamilton; Lieut. Col. W. A. Prast, officer commanding Grey and Simcoe’s, Owen Sound; Liet.-Col. J. Westhead, Toronto; Major, A. Caldwell, Oakville; Major Jack Symons, Penetang; Major J. Crutcher, Orillia. Regiment has units in Orillia, Meaford, Owen Sound, Durham, Collingwood, Barrie, Parry Sound and Midland. 

       Captain Edwin Jardine is the first Midland skipper to win the top hat in his home port in many years. He gladly surrendered the top hat for a certificate for a modern top piece after docking the Ashcroft at the Tiffin elevator Monday afternoon. R. J. Moffatt, secretary – manager of the Midland Chamber of Commerce, J. G. Hendrickson, CSL manager in Midland, Capt. and Mrs. Jardine and mayor Charles Parker. 

       Future citizens in training. First Midland (St. Mark’s Anglican Church) Cub Pack with Cub Master Ray Worrell in the back. South Georgian Bay Boy Scouts Association has asked local municipal councils for financial support. (No names are given for this photo) (Our scarves “neckers” were red and blue) 

      This Red Tamworth sow gave birth to a litter of twenty piglets on the farm of Jack Toole, R.R. 2 Midland, a couple of weeks ago. All but five survived, one with the help of a baby bottle. Farm officials say the national average is eight pigs in a litter and anything over a dozen is unusual. Her last effort was fourteen. 

      Baseball is in the air in Midland again, first organizational meeting held at the YMCA Thursday. Larry Greene, Buzz Deschamp, Joe Faragher, Jack Hendrickson, Murray Yorke, John Power and Harold Jackson. 

       Members of the agricultural science class at MPDHS show off the last of the chicks reared in their incubator. Joanne VanderVoort, Carol VanLuven and Priscilla Quesnelle have observed over 1,000 eggs through the various stages of development. 

      • Due to Good Friday on the 19th the County Herald was not published this week.
      • Free Press Headline, Wednesday, April 14th; “Quartet on Spring Hunt 14 Year Old Youth Shot” A 14-year-old Victoria Harbour lad narrowly missed being instantly killed in the first hunting accident of the 1957 season, Monday afternoon. In St. Andrew’s Hospital, Midland, is Robert LaChappelle son of Mr. and Mrs. Fabian LaChappelle, Victoria Harbour. Robert was hit in the face by a bullet accidentally discharged from a .22 calibre rifle. The bullet struck the lad in the right cheek, finally lodging near his ear.
      • “Ask Six Municipalities To Share In Hospital Obligation, Town Shoulders Major Load” Midland taxpayers and private contributors underwrote nearly 90 percent of the $455,000 which had to be raised outside of government grants to build the new St. Andrews Hospital. “This is at least one-third in excess of our community share,” board chairman R. J. Pinchin told the annual meeting at the YMCA Monday night. “Accordingly, steps are being taken to establish the financial obligations of the municipalities whose citizens are enjoying the benefits of the facilities at St. Andrews.”
      • Boys and girls committee of Midland Y’s Men’s Club is busy completing plans for this year’s monster Easter egg hunt in Midland’s Little Lake Park. The hunt is to get under way Saturday morning at 10.30 a.m. A new twist is to be added to the hunt this year. “Treasure” disks are to be dropped by a Georgian Bay Airways plane. In previous years they were hidden by club members.
      • New Penetang hospital is too small? Dr. R. Lauzon, president of the medical staff, said the doctors required a second “gas” machine for use in the minor operating room. He explained it was impossible under the present set-up to carry on two operations at the same time unless ether was used as an anaesthetic. When he had submitted the request, the superintendent, Sister Mary Camelia, asked where they would put the patients if operations were being performed simultaneously. She intimated the staff was being hard-pressed at the moment to find sufficient beds, and that a point had been reached where, on occasion, it had been found necessary to delay operations until beds were available.
      • Nearly 500 Midland and district citizens accepted an invitation to stroll through the greenhouses and main store of Perrin’s Flower Shop Sunday afternoon. The event was sponsored by Midland ‘Y’ Auxiliary. Most of those present were making their first visit inside the five large sections of greenhouses located behind the store. Visitors entered through the King Street doors where they were greeted by an array of cut flowers in tall standards. Live ducklings added to the effectiveness of the display.
      • TEN YEARS AGO THIS WEEK; Midland took its first step toward the establishment of a local museum when council accepted as a gift the Edgehill residence and surrounding parkland, from the estate of the late Mrs. James Playfair. Among the suggested names for the museum were Midland Museum, Playfair Museum and Huronia House. (Huronia House was selected)* * * Dry forces won out in a Coldwater vote for beer stores, for the second time. The first vote was in 1912. One woman, Mrs. R. Sheppard, travelled all the way from Chicago to cast her ballot. * * * An early morning fire destroyed the Stewart Taxi Co. on Hugel Avenue. Nearly 500 citizens were awakened about 5 a.m. to ringing telephones. Fusing of a telephone cable in front of the burning frame building was the cause. * * * Midland’s unpaid taxes of $180,000 dating from the time the town went bankrupt in 1934, had been reduced to $35,098.60 by the end of 1946. * * * Ships had left Midland and Port McNicoll harbors and were slowly making progress toward Giant’s Tomb and open water. * * * Scholarship winners, at the 1947 Midland Y’s Men’s Music Festival were Ronald Atkinson and Donald Stevens, Midland, George Renton, Waubaushene; Georgina White, Big Chute; Jean Prentice,  Victoria Harbour; and Greta Pearson, Midland. The youngest competitor in the festival was 4-year-old Lois Cowan. She placed second in the six years and under piano solo class, although she had been playing only three months.
      • Province applies a .20 cent per gallon tax on diesel fuel used in transportation as of April 1st. This does not apply to heating oil.
      • The first ship to reach bay ports this season was the CSL steamship T. R. McLagan, which docked at the CPR elevator in Port McNicoll at 11.10 a.m. Monday after what her skipper termed “the worst spring trip I’ve ever seen in my 51 years”. Capt. Alex Wilson of Sarnia, commodore of the CSL fleet, predicted two more weeks will hardly make an impression on the heavy ice the McLagan battled from Port Arthur. His ship left the lakehead April 11 and with the help of no less than four icebreakers made Sault Ste. Marie Sunday. It is expected to take only 15 hours to unload the 650,000 bushels of wheat.
      • Midland’s population now stands at 8,250 and shows an increase of more than 1,000 since 1951 according to the 1956 census. Penetang gained 471 new citizens, bringing its present total to 5,420. Barrie easily retained its lead over Orillia as the largest town in the county, with a population of 16,851. New figures for other North Simcoe municipalities, with the 1951 figure in brackets, are Victoria Harbour 1,012 (953); Port McNicoll 932 (884); Elmvale 897 (808); Coldwater 693 (583). Tiny Township proved to be the most heavily populated North Simcoe township, although its 4,011 figure represents an increase of only 101 from the last census. Figures for other district townships are Tay, 3,105 (2,793); Medonte, 2,388 (2,201); Matchedash, 365 (397); Flos, 2,315 (2,020). Simcoe County’s population rose from 106,482 in 1951 to a present high, of 127,016. There are 1,146 more males than females in the county.
      • S. S. South American will call at Midland on an excursion run June 19, Midland Harbourmaster Dave Hewis told this newspaper. Mr. Hewis said the big cruise ship would arrive on an excursion run sponsored by the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce. She is scheduled to arrive at Midland 8 a.m. June 19 and leave at 11.30 a.m.
      • Want Ads –  BARBARA ANN Beauty Salon, 248 King St., above Jory’s Drug Store; specializing in all lines of beauty culture. Barbara Bell, proprietor. For appointments phone LA. 6-5591.      * * *  MAJOR HAIRDRESSING! Gertrude Major, Prop., 215 King St., phone L A . 6-6242, Midland.  * * * BRICK AND BLOCK Work. Chimneys built and repaired. Phone LA. 6-2464, Earl Black, 286 Queen St., Midland. * * * FOR DECORATING, painting, or paper hanging, samples and estimates free. Earl Asselin, phone 21J, Victoria Harbour 6 to 7 p.m.
      • Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – May 24th to 31st, 1957


        Click on Photos to EnlargeFor more than four decades William Steer’s bass voice has been a fixture in the choir of Midland’s Knox Presbyterian Church. His four daughters and son have also sung in the choir at various times, and granddaughter Patsy Steer at right is carrying on the tradition. Mrs. Arthur McElroy at the piano has also served as a junior choir leader for two years. Mr. Steer is the head millwright at Midland Simcoe Elevator where he has worked for 33 years. 

         Proud of the plaque they were awarded at South Georgian Bay District Scout camp over the weekend are members of Fox Patrol, 1st Midland Troop. Tom Gordanier, Murray Mostyn, Paul Downer, Doug Faint, Bill Howard, Ross Clute (patrol leader) and Ken Cleary. The plaque was presented during visitor’s day ceremonies at the Sturgeon River camp site. 

        Group photo of the Scout Camp during visitor’s day.

         Winners of the Midland YMCA floor hockey league this year were the Mustangs, seen receiving the Unamotus Trophy from Ken Mackie president of the Unamotus Hi-Y Club. The trophy was awarded on a basis of teamwork and attendance, as well as on league standings. Left to right are, Bob Strickland, Gerald Karch, Dave Carpenter, Jerry Beteau, Ken Mackie, Neil Murday, Randy Knapp and Bob Weckman. The boys were also presented with crests, saw a movie and were stuffed with ice cream and cake.

         

         “Knots and bends” are still an important part of naval cadet training as Chief Petty Officer Doug Ladoucer and Ordinary Cadets Jim McKinnon and M. Light discovered when inspected by Lieutenant Commander J. R. H. Ley of Hamilton during a recent inspection of RCSCC Huron. 

         

        North Simcoe Women’s Institutes re-elected their entire slate of officers at the annual meeting in North River United Church May 22. In the front row, left to right, are secretary-treasurer Mrs. M. C. Long of Waubaushene, third vice-president Mrs. Ernest Ayers of Jarratt, first vice-president Mrs. Beverley Walker of Eady; back row: second vice president Mrs. Ed Sallows of Warminster, area chairman Mrs. G. R. Lane of Coldwater and president Mrs. Lloyd Dunlop of Moonstone. 

        Donors are needed for the “walking blood bank” at St. Andrew’s Hospital as even this modern refrigerating unit can only keep stored whole blood three weeks. Lab technician Bill Zinck reports that human donors reduce waste by making blood available only when needed. 

         

        • The headline, Midland Free Press, Wednesday, May 29th, 1957; Leitz Company Awards Contract for 11,500 Square Foot Addition. Coincident with the celebration of the fifth anniversary of the firm’s establishment in Canada, Guenther Leitz, president of Ernst Leitz (Canada) Limited today announced the construction of an 11,500 square foot addition to the company’s Midland plant. A contract for the new building, which will be 50 percent larger than the original plant built five years ago, has been awarded to Alfred Rei, a Midland contractor.
        • The headline, County Herald, Friday, May 31st, 1957; Cadi Levies Heavy Fines on Pair Nabbed at Liquor Party at Beach. “Police Search Two Cabins Find 22-Pint Beer Cache, Several Cases of Empties.” Magistrate K. A. Cameron again served ample notice in Penetang court Thursday that he intends “to carry out his threat, announced last week, of cracking down on illegal drinking at North Simcoe beaches again this year”. Two Toronto lads, both 18, were assessed a total of $99.50 each in fines and costs after being found guilty on charges of obtaining liquor while under the legal age of 21 years.
        • A member of a group of men and women largely associated with the early growth of Midland, and an ardent supporter of municipal progress, Martha Grant Pratt died here Sunday in her 79th year. She was the widow of the late David S. Pratt of 286 Fifth Street. A private funeral service conducted by Rev. J. L. Self of Knox Presbyterian Church was held Tuesday afternoon at A. Barrie and Sons funeral home. Pallbearers were W. A. McGill, G. C. Bennett, Wm. A. Robinson, Dr. Churchill Swan, Dr. A. H. Pinchin and John Pinchin. Interment was at Lakeview Cemetery.
        • Construction work, which started recently on an extension to the main floor of Penetang Legion building, will double the size of the present hall, according to Orval Ambeau, chairman in charge of the work. The addition, 57 by 50 feet, is being added to the rear of the present building, which was the residence of Dr. Nettleton before the Legion purchased it. Plans call for a new kitchen with modern equipment, new washroom, cloakroom, and other facilities for a large hall. The present hall will be completely redecorated to match the interior of the new portion, and a new hardwood floor will extend throughout.
        • Ten Years Ago This Week – Members of Georgian Bay Flying Club marked the first runway for their field, midway between Penetang and Midland. *** Finance Minister Abbott had set a limit of $10 in American currency to be held by Canadians. Previously it was permissible to hold $100. *** Monthly production of creamery butter and cheddar cheese in Ontario showed an increase in butter production and a decrease in cheese stocks. *** Rev. A. C. Stewart, D.D., of Knox Presbyterian Church, Midland, was among guest speakers at the diamond jubilee of Barrie Presbyterial of the Women’s Missionary Society celebrated in Orillia Presbyterian Church. *** Rev. George W. Dorey, D.D., of Toronto preached at St. Paul’s United Church for the Midland High School cadets annual church parade. *** Plans were made for expanding two Orillia schools. The move was forced by increased population and crowded classrooms. * * * The S.S. “Athabasca” was sold to the Steel Company of Canada. It was towed to Hamilton and broken up for scrap metal.
        • On May 31 the University of Montreal will confer an honorary degree of “doctor of laws” on Wilfrid W. Jury. The event is of no small consequence not only to the University of Western Ontario which he serves as curator of its Museum of Indian Archaeology and Pioneer Life, to Huronia whose historical resources he has both explored and developed, but to the people of this entire land.
        • All persons 12 years and over in Midland will be given the opportunity of having free chest X-rays during a community survey by the National Sanitarium Association, June 11, 12, and 13. The unit will be located in Loblaws parking area and will be in operation from 2 to 9 p.m.
        • Penetang Chamber of Commerce, Tuesday night, named George Kerr president for the ensuing year. The vice-president is Ed Webster, and secretary-treasurer will be Ken Macdonald. Chairmen named to head the committees were: finance, Les Gumb; industry, Chas. Sweet; tourist and publicity, M. F. Bellehumeur; merchants, Geo. Mead; history, J. M. H. McGuire and W. H. Morrison; agriculture, Ted Annand; membership, Bill Belrose.
        • Leases for a selected group of lots on Christian Island for summer cottage purposes are being taken up at a satisfactory rate, according to J. Sheane, the Indian Agent at the Island Reservation (now Beausoleil First Nation). The announcement of the band’s decision to lease lots for this purpose was first made in this newspaper last summer. Since that time some 37 agreements have been signed, according to the agent. He said this rate is satisfactory, as the amount of work involved in opening up the section will not allow the whole area to be leased in a short time.
        • On June 12, the telephone system in Honey Harbour and District will be cut over to dial operations, H. A. Kilroy, Bell Telephone manager for this region, announced this week. The change will be made at 7.30 a.m. when calling has reached a low ebb and will be carried out in less than two minutes. The changeover will be made according to a closely co-ordinated procedure which requires split-second timing. With the changeover, all Honey Harbour and district telephone numbers will be changed. New ones will consist of the exchange name and numeral, PLaza 6, -and four other figures. A typical Honey Harbour number would be PLaza 6-1234, or 756-1234.
        • Charles Godfrey, who was born and raised on the outskirts of Coldwater, fell 65 feet to his death May 28 from a Lands and Forests lookout tower west of Nipigon. A report from Beardmore stated Mr. Godfrey, 66, suffered a heart seizure as he climbed to the top of the MacDiarmid tower. His wife, Margaret, climbing a few feet below him, looked up when he did not answer her conversation and saw him slumped between the rungs. Unable to help him on the open ladder, she hurried down with intentions of running over a mile for help. As she stepped away from the ladder, her husband fell.
        • Hand Lawn-Mowers Sharpened, 304 PRINCESS STREET, Midland, Lorne Corbett.
        • A Committee of Midland Ladies Cordially invites you and your friends of the Georgian Bay Area to meet and have tea with Honourable L. B. “Mike” Pearson Secretary of State for External Affairs and William “Bill” Robinson Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons Midland YMCA on Friday, May 31, 2 – 4 p.m. Everyone is Most Welcome to Attend!
        • An invitation is extended to you to meet Dr. P. B. Rynard Progressive Conservative Candidate for Simcoe East and Mrs. Rynard at a Tea to be held Thursday, May 30, from 3 – 6 p.m. in the YMCA Parlor, Midland. Given by the Midland District Women’s Progressive Conservative Association.

      Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – April 8th to 15th 1957

      Click on Photos to Enlarge  This rare orchid should be a welcome sight to snow-weary Midlanders who tour the greenhouses of Perrin’s Flower Shop Sunday. Tour is being sponsored by the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the YMCA. Besides a host of flowers in full bloom, Mr. Perrin has arranged a number of plots, showing growth from seedling to maturity. Examining the orchid above is Patsy Perrin. 

       A heap of wreckage being towed behind a wrecking truck was all that was left of a heavy truck after it had been struck by an outbound CNR passenger train on the William Street level crossing. Climbing out of the coal yard in low gear in a heavy rain storm the driver did not see the train coming.  The driver of the vehicle escaped with only a severe shaking up. 

       A familiar landmark in Midland’s east end is the old Shearlings (Woolen Ware) plant that was destroyed by fire several years ago. The location is the north side of Yonge Street between Princess and William Streets. The top picture was taken during the fire in March of 1954. It is being demolished by the owner and local contractor Henry Bernick. Demolition and salvage are being carried out by Sylvester Sutter of Port McNicoll. All buildings except the former warehouse will be razed. 

       Officials say the water is low all over Ontario this spring, but nowhere is it lower than in this man-made pond in Midland’s reservoir area. In some manner, the dam was weakened under the cement sluice-way in the centre background of the picture. Muskrats are considered the culprits. This is the smaller of two dams built in recent years by Midland PUC in an effort to maintain the town’s artesian well flow. 

       Applying a plaster base coat to the walls of one of the bright, airy offices in Midland’s new municipal building are Monty Lalonde, left, and Ray Boucher. Both are employed by Lloyd Murday, the Midland general contractor. Non-arrival of steel frames for some of the huge windows has caused considerable delay in the progress of the building.  Both men went on to establish their own businesses and were considered locally, the best in their profession. 

       Delay in the delivery of materials has slowed progress on the new Municipal Building in Midland. Looking over the plans are Midland Planing Mills employee Thomas Trew and his son Garnet. 

      Cup Cakes lined up and ready for the annual Midland Lions Figure Skating Club carnival on the weekend. From front to back, Nancy Tully, Jane Spiker, Grace Ellen Parker, Valerie Somers, Sharon James and Kathy Brandon.

      Three more tasty members of the Cake Land group who performed in the Lions Figure Skating Club revue this weekend. Miss Jelly Roll, Barbara Jean Parish centre is flanked by a pair of lemon chiffon cakes. Susan Harries left and Judy Fitzgerald right. 

      Three more members of the Cake Land group who performed in the Lions Figure Skating Club revue this weekend. Angela Magnus, who was Miss Strawberry Shortcake, Geraldine Borsa and Linda Roach. 

       Extending its original field of making boat hulls, Midland Reinforced Plastics Ltd. is now turning out other articles, such as this handsome bucket-type chair. They come in colour combinations of red and onyx, green and shamrock, canary yellow and onyx, and grey and onyx. Examining the finished product is Miss Joyce Bowman. 

       In the Federal political ring for a second try is Dr. P. B. Rynard of Orillia, nominated Progressive Conservative nominee for the Simcoe East riding. Raising Dr. Rynard’s arm in victory at the convention held in Midland Thursday night is Oliver H. Smith, Q. C., vice president of the Simcoe East Conservative Association.


      The battle at Vimy Ridge is being commemorated by Canadians both here and at the memorial in France. John Lowes was born in England, emigrated with his family in 1905 and lived at 162 Sixth Street Midland. John enlisted at the age of 20 and was killed on the first day of the battle of Vimy Ridge,  April 9th, 1917. For many years the “In Memoriam” above was posted in the Midland paper during the second week of April. His mother Mary died at the age of 82 in November of 1956 and his father Septimus died on June 14, 1960. He was one of sixty-eight local men who died during the first war.

      • The headline, Free Press Herald, Wednesday, April 10th; “CUSTOMS PORT REVENUE HITS POST-WAR RECORD” Indicative of the industrial expansion in the area, customs and excise collections at the Port of Midland have hit a new high since the 1943-44 World War II years. The collector of Customs and Excise A. E. Martin revealed in his report this week that total collections for the 1956-57 fiscal year amounted to $917,745.20, an increase of $165,329.67 over the previous fiscal year.
      • The headline, County Herald, Friday, April 12th; “DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES RE-ORGANIZE  – BACK DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION PLAN” In a virtually unanimous decision, municipalities of North Simcoe voted Wednesday night to continue the Huronia and Georgian Bay Development Commission program of tourist promotion and conservation.
      • The opening of the navigation season brought an early taste of bad luck to the CSL freighter Coverdale, which left Midland early last week. One of its crew members, Graden McLennan, of Hilton Beach (Algoma) is presumed to have drowned at Toledo, Ohio, Friday. Other members of the crew said McLennan had boarded another freighter, the Hochelaga, which left Port McNicoll the same day as the Coverdale, to visit a friend. He fell from the ship’s ladder as he was leaving. The incident occurred at the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway’s Presque Isle dock.
      • Jerome Gignac, chairman of the board of directors of Penetang General Hospital, in presenting the 1956 auditors’ report at the annual meeting of the board Wednesday night, announced a net deficit for the year of $17,243. In 1955 the hospital had a surplus of $1,021.
      • Annual financial statement of Fort Penetanguishene Museum indicates a healthy balance at the end of the year of $1,222.45. Expenses during 1956 amounted to $3,898. Major expenditure incurred during the year was the replacement of the roof on the Officer’s Quarters building, the cost of which was $1,475. A large part of this had been underwritten through an anonymous donation of $1,000. Salaries for caretaker and curator amounted to $1,056. Admissions during 1956 accounted for $915 of the total revenue received.
      • A citizens committee, organised to oppose the establishment of a liquor store and brewers’ warehouse in Midland, has named J. W. Smith chairman, to head up the committee’s program for the forthcoming liquor vote in Midland. Other officers are vice-chairman Rev. M. A. Beriault; treasurer, James Playfair; campaign manager C. M. Whitcher; finance, V. G. Edwards; and publicity, Rev. Ralph D. Wright.
      • The Bank of Montreal has announced today that H. Gordon Paice, manager of the bank’s Midland branch for the past five years, will be transferred to the Montreal head office as an inspector. Mr. Paice, who has served four years in an executive position on St. Andrews Hospital Board of Directors, several as treasurer, and four years on Midland Chamber of Commerce (president in 1956), will be succeeded as manager at Midland by Wm. A. Child.
      • As of yesterday, at least six new teachers will be required for the MPDHS staff when fall classes begin in September. The MPDHS Board has already placed advertisements for five positions in metropolitan papers. Lorne M. Johnston, the principal, said yesterday that a sixth new teacher will be necessary with the retirement of Robert Donovan. He is a social studies’ teacher who has been at MPDHS several years. The retirement of Mrs. William Bartlett, a home economics, foods, teacher, may cause the board the most trouble in securing a replacement if past experiences hold to form. Wife of instrumental music teacher William Bartlett, Mrs. Bartlett joined the staff last September. Two new teachers will be required for girls’ physical education. Retiring is Mrs. Robert Elliott, who taught other lower school subjects as well. She came to MPDHS in September. Head of the girls “Phys. Ed” department, Miss Barbara Murphy is taking a similar position with Oshawa Collegiate and Vocational Institute. She joined the staff of Midland District High School in 1952.  Another history and social studies teacher will be required with the resignation of Donald Kenwell, who is going to Parry Sound District High School. Although last year was his first at MPDHS, Mr. Kenwell taught for several years in Midland and Penetang public schools. Head of the history department for the past two years, Miss Reba Young is moving on to Tilbury District High School.
      • J. W. Bald celebrated his 89th birthday Sunday, April 7. Until his retirement a few years ago Mr. Bald was Midland’s oldest King Street businessman. He operated a photographic studio in a section of the building now occupied by R. E. Simpson & Sons (Simply Country).
      • 25 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK; At the annual meeting of Ontario Educational and Trustees’ Association two resolutions to abolish final examinations for entrance into high schools or continuation schools were rejected. * * * George Marchand and Sons of Lafontaine were selling maple syrup for $2.25 a gallon. * * * Captain Percy Beatty of Midland won the Harbourmaster’s silk hat April 6 for being the first ship to enter Toronto harbour that season. He was captain of S.S. Coalhaven. * * * The question of disbanding the band was before Midland council but no decision was reached. Some councillors had stated the money could be used to alleviate the problem of unemployment. * * * Breakfast bacon, which now ranges from 79 cents to 89 cents per pound, sold for 16 cents at a grocery store in Midland. The Free Press Herald, however, was sold for 5 cents, both then and now. * * * About six inches of snow fell April 13 in Midland and eight in Orillia. It was difficult to estimate the exact amount because of drifting. *** The steamer W. J. Stewart, see photo below, was launched at the Collingwood shipyards. Mrs. J. S. Leitch performed the christening ceremony.

      For more than 40 years this vessel, named for the celebrated Canadian Dominion Hydrographer, William J. Stewart, operated on the British Columbia coast collecting data needed to create new marine charts. She was built in Collingwood, Ontario in 1932 and was sailed to the west coast for service as a Dominion Government Ship (D.G.S.) and later as a Canadian Survey Ship (C.S.S.). With her white hull, she was one of the most distinctive and recognisable ships on the Pacific coast. In 2017 she is being broken up for scrap. Attributed to, MacFarlane, John M. (2016) The Canadian Princess ex–C.S.S. William J. StewartNauticapedia.ca 2016. http://nauticapedia.ca/Gallery/TITLE.php

      Huronia Museum – Looking Back 60 Years Ago in North Simcoe – April 1st to 7th 1957

      Click on Photos to Enlarge  Esther Lowes is skating one of the solo parts in the annual Midland Figure Skating Club’s carnival. Esther the “Angel Cake” is lured by the “Devil’s Food Cake” (Kennedy Self) and finally rescued by the “Gingerbread Man” (John Svoboda). There will be a cast of 150 local skaters. 

       Midland Skating Club is holding their annual carnival Friday and Saturday. Bonnie Leclair is the bride and Maureen Mohan portrays the groom. A giant wedding cake is one of the many props provided by the event’s sponsors, the Midland Lions Club.

       W.  L. “Billy” Logan at the wheel of his Imperial Oil delivery truck was awarded the Ontario Safety League award Saturday for 20 years of accident-free commercial driving. Only eleven other drivers in the province attained the award this year that was presented at Queen’s Park. 

       The right of way became a debatable question when these two Midland drivers, inspired by Wednesday’s sunny skies, went out driving and met on the Penetang road (Vinden Street). His arms folded defiantly, the younger driver had to be pacified with a sucker. 

      This farm house was threatened by a fire that started in an adjacent garage on the property of Cecil F. Woods at Lot 10 concession 4 Tiny Twp. (not Cecil Wood the Tiny Councillor). Neighbours formed a bucket brigade and the Midland Fire Department arrived and finished the job. Lost were a tractor, feed chopper, tools, syrup pails and other equipment. 

       The 2017 CDN dollar equivalent is 1.25 million dollars.

       This was a popular item at the recent Edward’s fashion show. “Edna Arbour displays a two piece dress and coat ensemble in pretty tan and turquoise print. The full duster coat shows off her sheath dress to advantage.” This photo was used in a fashion advertising supplement promoting Edward’s Specialty Shoppe. It contained multiple pages and combined ad mattes from suppliers with photos of local models. 

       Photo from Edward’s Specialty Shoppe spring fashion supplement to the County Herald April 1957, the model is Mary Arbour. “This beige and black jacket dress was worn by Mary Arbour for the recent Edward’s fashion show created a great deal of interest. The jacket buttons up the back and the sheath dress features a cross over neckline.” 

      Last Wednesday night was a big night for little Douglas Hook when he attended the father and son banquet at Knox Presbyterian Church under the sponsorship of the Men’s Club. Doug not only had a good dinner but also had a chance to meet Jimmy Morrison, a defenseman with Toronto Maple Leafs. Doug, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hook, also got the autograph of the NHL star, as did a host of other young lads who crowded around the popular Leaf player. 

      Midland is making an early start on its roadwork this year, as witnessed by the scene above, taken on Dominion Ave., in front of St. Andrew’s Hospital. The block between Russell and Charles Streets is being excavated to a depth of several feet to provide better drainage before a permanent surface is placed on the road. 

       Brownie night at the Salvation Army Citadel, more than 30 members of the Second Midland Pack were present to receive awards or to be enrolled. Being enrolled were Linda Duggan, Linda Nopper, Karen Chapman, Eleanor Moffatt, Marie Louise Parker, Carol Launder, Marlene Douglas, Edith and Vivian Lowen, Janice Hawke, Sharon Howard, Barbara Ann Merkley and Cheryl Tyndall. Receiving golden stars and first year service stars were; Judith Reynolds, Patsy Dalziel, Linda Dagg, Gayle Langridge, Anne Davidson, Marilyn Vail, Becky and Patsy Paul, Jo-Anne Ambrose, Linda Bonner, Sharon and Connie Stelter, Judy Wilson, Laurie Young, Jan Worrell, Karen Greisbach, Peggy Krochko, Sally MacDonald. Second-year service stars went to Elizabeth Boldt and Nancy Wilson.

       Pausing on the stairway at Midland Armoury between dances at the Garrison Badminton Club dance Friday night are officers of the RCAC unit Grey and Simcoe Foresters and guests. Ladies are Mrs. Ed Brewer, Mrs. Jack Kennedy, Mrs. Jim Park (Shirley) and Mrs. J. S. Corcoran (Helen). Their partners are Lieut. Jim Park, Capt. J. S. Corcoran, Ed Brewer and Capt. Jack Kennedy. 

       A leading businessman in Midland for 33 years and mayor for 3 years, J. S. McDowell of Manly Street observed his 80th birthday March 27th. Mr. McDowell was born on a farm at what is now Ebenezer in 1877. It was his father, the late Thomas McDowell, who donated the land on which the old Ebenezer Methodist Church was built. John is the last surviving member of that family. The old farm has since been the home of several generations of Fagans. Mr. McDowell received his early education at Ebenezer and then attended business college in Owen Sound. Coming to Midland in 1906, he became a partner in the Big Four stores. His associates were Silas Milligan, James Stafford, and W. W. Sneath. Mr. Sneath is still living and resides in Toronto. The “Big Four” operated three stores in the buildings now occupied by Livingston’s, Diana Restaurant and the Singer Company. They sold everything from meat to general furnishings. In 1906, Mr. McDowell bought out one of the stores (the one now operated by Livingston’s) where he ran a men’s furnishing store until ill health forced him to sell out in 1929. In 1933 he moved to Bradford where he operated another general store until 1940. Back in 1908, Mr. McDowell had married the former Katherine (Kate) Piggott. Mr. McDowell first entered municipal politics as a Midland alderman in 1915. He moved steadily up the ladder and was deputy-reeve in 1916, reeve in 1917, and mayor the next three years. “They were good years. Midland was a real good business town in those days, with the shipyard, smelter and the lumber mills still running,” said the former mayor. He also served on the library and school boards at other times. 

      • County Herald, Friday, April 5th – Headline- “Ten Orr Lake Cottages Entered – Police Charge Three Toronto Boys” A routine investigation by OPP Const. Ray Wilkinson of Elmvale last week resulted in finding two young girls missing from Toronto for 10 days, and charges of breaking, entry, and theft against the three Toronto youths found with them in an Orr Lake cottage.
      • Free Press Herald, Wednesday, April 3rd – Headline – “PUC Confirms Water Meter Order See Installation Completed by Fall” “Estimate Project to Cost In Neighbourhood of $40,000.00 Hope to Cut Water Wastage”
      • Notice: Parking Meters will be in operation in Midland, Monday, April 8th, 1957 R. J. CAMERON, Chief of Police, Midland.
      • St. Mark’s Choir, “A Lenten Cantata” Wednesday, April 10,  at 8 P.M. in St. Mark’s Church (Third Street) Soloists  Mrs. Frances Conacher (Soprano) Mrs. Emily Lloyd (Contralto)
      • Heavy fines, totalling $500, were meted out against three Penetang men who pleaded guilty to infractions of the Liquor Control Act when they appeared before Magistrate K . A. Cameron in Penetang police court Thursday. The owner of a taxi business was fined $300.00 or one month when he pleaded guilty to a charge of having liquor in a place other than his residence. Two men who drive cabs out of the same stand were each fined $100.00 and costs for selling liquor.
      • Three more Canada Steamship Lines freighters left Midland harbor this morning. J. G. Hendrickson, C S L manager at Midland, said the Sir James Dunn and the Thunder Bay left Tiffin elevator, where they had wintered, about 7 a. m. and 7.30 a.m. respectively. The Lemoyne which was at the coal dock about 9.30 a.m., was expected to clear at 10 a.m. Mr. Hendrickson said the Coverdale and Hochelaga, which, left Midland and Port harbors Monday night, spent most of Tuesday bucking their way through windrow ice between Hope Island and Giant’s Tomb. The ice was piled up 12 to 14 feet high, it was reported. The two ships finally made open water about 5.45 p.m. Tuesday and today were reported to be past Detroit on their way to Toledo for coal cargoes. Ships will be confined to the lower lakes for a time owing to heavy drift ice in Lake Superior, he said. He anticipated a busy season as most Bayport elevators have plenty of room for grain.
      • Ivan Vasey, 48, of Orillia, has been chosen the superintendent of the new county home at Penetang, at an annual salary of $3,800. He will take over his duties April 15 and will move his family to Penetang as soon as he can find a home. He is married, with two sons. The county committee also appointed Dr. Henry Marchildon of Penetang as the physician for the home which will have a capacity of 54, including 19-bed patients. Although the official opening will not be held until June, the home will be used as soon as furnishings are in place. There are sufficient persons already under county care to fill it as soon as arrangements for use are completed.
      • The introduction of two all-expense weekend cruises on the Great Lakes was recently announced by Canadian Pacific Steamships. The first cruise will leave Port McNicoll June 8, aboard the S.S. “Assiniboia” and arrive at Sault Ste. Marie the following afternoon. On the return voyage, passengers will sail aboard the S.S. “Keewatin” and arrive in Port McNicoll June 10. The second weekend cruise will leave Port McNicoll on June 15 for Sault Ste. Marie.
      • Huronia Council, Knights of Columbus, joined last week with more than a million members of the order in observing the diamond jubilee of their order, which now has more than 3,800 councils. It was 75 years ago, March 29, 1882, that the legislature of Connecticut confirmed by charter the organization of a fraternal protective insurance society by a small band of fewer than 20 men, called by their founders the Knights of Columbus.
      • Lawrence Curran of the Midland office of Bausch and Lomb Optical Co. Limited, Canada, was recently elected to the board of directors of the Canadian corporation. Mr. Curran, who was made foreman in charge of manufacturing at the opening of the plant in May 1949, is now branch manager in complete charge of the Midland branch, which started operations on a very modest scale in the Midland YMCA basement in 1947. He was the supervisor of 14 employees at that time.
      • Midland was spared a minor riot yesterday afternoon when a rumor that Elvis Presley was in town was discounted. Witnesses said they saw a big black limousine pull up to the Ontario Cafe early in the afternoon. Several youths with sideburns entered, and they said one of them was the spitting image of the popular singer with the palpitating pelvis. Presley had a singing engagement in Toronto last night. The County Herald reporter was unable to obtain any confirmation whatever to the rumour but uncovered an even more startling bit of information. One of the proprietors of the restaurant claimed he’d never heard of the rock and roll king!
      • The stones are stored away, the brooms stacked in the corner and the lights turned out on another season at Midland Curling Club. A big “do” Saturday night in which prizes for various competitions were presented, wound things up for 1956-57. It’s a cinch the ice couldn’t be used for curling again after a host of members enjoyed their annual end of the season skate on the smooth surface.
      • Bit of Fun –For example”, said the teacher to her memory-training class, “let us suppose you want to remember the name of the poet Bobby Burns. Get a mental picture of a policeman in flames. Get the idea? Bobby Burns.” “I get the idea,” replied the bright student. “But how is one to know it doesn’t represent Robert Browning?”
      • Robert John Reynolds died at Novar, Ont. March 20, following a coronary thrombosis. He was 83. Rev. J. R. Fralick conducted the funeral service March 23 from St. John’s Church, Waverley. Pallbearers were Art Reynolds, Ivan French, Roy Whetham, Norman Reynolds, Albert Reynolds and Alvin Reynolds. Mr. Reynolds was born and educated in Wyebridge and married Sophia Darby at Elmvale in 1900. He farmed on the same farm at Waverley for 48 years but had spent the last two years in Novar. A member of the Anglican Church, he was a Conservative in politics. His record of public service includes 14 years on Medonte Township council and many years as a school trustee. He was also on the committee which helped to place the Waverley War Memorial in 1920 and served on the group until 1950. Predeceased by his wife in 1945, he is survived by children Mrs. Earl Brown (May), Mrs. Orville Snider (Edna), Mrs. Doug Martin (Bernice) of Midland, Mrs. John Cameron (Velma) and Mrs. Armon Tripp of Elmvale, and George Reynolds of Novar. There are two sisters, Mrs. Robert Grigg (Emma) and Mrs. Wm. Charles (Hannah) of Wyebridge; and four brothers, Frank of Waverley, Henry of Wyebridge, Fred of Midland and Ernest of Richmond Hill.